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Hungry for History’s core hub is our Blog. Here, we provide news on competitions, school ideas & projects and commemorative events that are happening throughout the United Kingdom. Here are the latest ideas and initiatives to help inspire you. We need YOU though to help us keep this blog updated and to feed a growing appetite for history going forward! Additional news and updates are also posted regularly on Twitter and Facebook so please do follow us.

 

The aim of the blog is to encourage the sharing of ideas, the sharing of events and the forging of links with other like-minded schools and bring together teachers and children who are passionate about history and wish to participate in local commemorations, competitions and local outdoor classroom events.

 

If you have an idea, been part of, or organised an event or project that encourages history learning and discovery that you wish to share with other children, schools or organisations, please email us with details and photographs and we will post on our blog and link to our Twitter and Facebook.

Red White & Blue Day 2015

Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, September 16, 2015


 

Schools - Take to the skies for Red, White and Blue Day 2015 - Friday 9th October (or any day in October or November 2015)

 

Over 311 schools have registered so far. 

 

It's an opportunity for children to come to school dressed in red, white and blue and to donate just £1 to support the amazing work of ABF The Soldiers' Charity, the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund, and The Royal Navy and Royal Marines Charity. For more on how the money is spent, click here

 

Visit http://redwhiteblueday.co.uk/ to learn more and download the Welcome Pack, Poster, Flyer and Evacuee Competition.
 
 
 

  

 
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Schools - An opportunity to take part in the Waterloo Commemorations In June 2015

Victoria Nielson - Friday, April 24, 2015


www.thenwd.org.uk 

 

HOW YOUR SCHOOL CAN BE ACTIVELY INVOLVED


The New Waterloo Dispatch, in commemoration of the bicentenary, is a special and distinctive four-day event on an international scale, involving royalty, European governments, armed forces, civic representatives and the general public. In London it is expected to be the biggest event since 2012.

 

The New Waterloo Dispatch post chaise journey from Old Royal Navy College Greenwich to St James's Square, London on Sunday 21 June 2015 is the ceremonial interpretation of the news of Waterloo as brought to London in 1815 by Hon Major Henry Percy. The aim is to raise the profile of the Battle of Waterloo to the people of London, to present the New Waterloo Dispatches to prominent London people and to leave a lasting legacy. The route includes the Tower of London, Guildhall, Hyde Park Corner, Grosvenor Square, Waterloo Place and St James's Square.  

 

The core events programme of The New Waterloo Dispatch (NWD) is an important part of Waterloo 200, an umbrella organisation approved and supported by Government to oversee the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Granted charitable status in 2009, it is planning and co-coordinating the main events and pursuing an educational programme that is also seeking to create a living legacy.

 


 

The NWD is partnering with Hungry for History to help coordinate schools’ active involvement in a variety of NWD commemorative events in Kent and London in June 2015. We would like to engage with UK schools along or near the route of the Dispatch - The Waterloo Way, inviting children to participate in some of the ceremonies through visual arts and costume.


We encourage schools to dress up in regency costume, wear military hats, carry flags of the countries involved in the Napoleonic Wars and line the NWD route wherever possible in Kent and in London.


Please visit http://thenwd.org.uk/events/england/ for more information on the New Waterloo Dispatch Ceremonies in Kent and London

 

THE WATERLOO PARADE ON SUNDAY 21ST JUNE 2015

The Mall, London


This high profile event will be a spectacular culmination of the Waterloo commemorations both in Belgium and London over the period 18-21st June. The Waterloo Parade from Horse Guards Parade down The Mall will include seven European visiting bands (Dutch Army Band, Zurich Police Band, Finnish Navy Band, French Artillery Band, Swedish Navy Youth Band, DVS Holland Marching Band, Polish Army Band) British military bands including the Royal Marines, Waterloo Band of the Rifles, Brentwood Imperial Youth Band, Wellington College CCF Corps of Drums, an International Pipe Band, 150 cadets from the three services and a great number of school children.

 

Schools Involvement in the Waterloo Parade:


We are looking for schools to create large heads of Napoleonic characters that can be carried on sticks during this parade. These could be the Commanders and Leaders, soldiers from many European armies, horses, etc. In line with the bicentenary, we hope to have 50+ schools, marching with these 200 heads, as part of this parade. Alternatively, schools can dress up in regency & Napoleonic costume, create & wear military headgear and wave the colours of the countries & regiments involved in the Napoleonic Wars.


The parade will provide a palpable show of the pan European dimension of culture, music, education & arts and it will create a visual focus on Waterloo 200's achievements and its enduring educational legacy.

 

This creativity is being supported by Radiator Arts, one of our Timeline 200 judges who have considerable experience in this type of field. As such, Radiator Arts has produced downloadable instructions for schools on how to make this large heads out of withy (strong flexible willow stem). These instructions are available to download at http://radiatorarts.co.uk/documents/withy-instructions.pdf. To help you, we have also provided below a suggested list of characters for schools’ consideration.

 

Suggested Napoleonic characters:


Napoleon

Josephine

Marshall Ney

Duke of Wellington

Field Marshall Blücher

The Prince of Orange

General Sir Thomas Picton (Top hat)

Lord Uxbridge, Marquess of Anglesea

Major Henry Percy

Commander James White Royal Navy

King Louis XVIII

Czar Alexander I of Russia

George III

The Prince Regent

Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand

Prince Clemens von Metternich

Richard Sharpe of the 95th 


Different headgear:


Guardsman’s Shako

Dragoon helmets

Polish Czapska

Imperial Guard bearskin

Scots Greys bearskin

Horse heads:

White/grey for Napoleon’s ‘Marengo’ and Scots Greys;

Black for cuirassiers

Brown for Wellington’s ‘Copenhagen’

 

Waterloo Objects


Please visit Waterloo 200’s website http://www.nam.ac.uk/waterloo200/ who have selected 200 historical objects from museums and private collections across Europe. Each tells a fascinating story of the Battle of Waterloo. Objects include Wellington’s Boots, Bagpipes, Imperial Eagles, Regimental Colours etc and we hope these will inspire your school’s imagination and provide us with an array of wonderful creations for the Parade.

 


 

We are also looking for one lone drummer boy. At the Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon's troops spent much of the day trying to capture the fortified house at Hougomont, which was defended by British Foot Guards. Finally, a detachment of French infantry broke in through the gate, which the Guards were able to close behind them; all the French soldiers were killed except for their drummer boy who was spared. This drummer boy will be the last to set off in the Waterloo Parade.

 


 

Please also visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleonic_Wars for more inspiration.

 

Crowd Estimate:


50,000

 

Crowd Profile:


General Public, mostly families and visitors to London.

 

Parade Schedule:


The below provides a high-level overview of the parade schedule. Those schools wishing to participate will be provided with more detailed instructions including their required time of arrival at Wellington Barracks.

 

There will be a staggered arrival of parade participants from 15.00-16.30 at Wellington Barracks prior to the Parade, which will commence at 6.15pm (1815).

 

Portaloos, a mobile medical station and refreshments will be available.

 

School children should be under direct care and supervision of their teachers (or parents/guardians) throughout.

 

At 1630 there will be brief made by the Parade Master and Safety Officer (teachers should be present).

 

From 16.50, the international bands will be entertaining the crowds by a series of musical performances in locations around St James’s Park from which point they will make their way to Horse Guards Parade.

 

At 17.35 the remainder of the participants will step off from Wellington Barracks in the direction of Horse Guards Parade via Birdcage Walk. All participants assemble at Horse Guard's Parade by 17.45.

 

At 18.15 The Royal Marines Band will lead the parade from Horse Guard’s Parade up the Mall to the Queen Victoria Memorial and back to Wellington Barracks.

 

At 18.30 The Royal Marines Band will arrive at Wellington Barracks

 

At 18.45 The Post Chaise, HCMR Travelling Escort and other Horse Drawn Carriages join the parade as the last detachment passes Marlborough Road.

 

At 18.50 The last detachment arrives at Wellington Barracks

 

At 19.00, there will be staggered departure onto Birdcage Walk

 

Of course, parents are also most welcome to attend with their children and therefore if you could also pass this on to your parent body, we would be very grateful. 

 

All ages welcome. 

 

If your school would like to take part in this extraordinary event, please contact Hungry for History directly via email in order to reserve places. Please register your interest early to avoid disappointment.


To download the above information as a PDF please see http://www.hungryforhistory.info/assets/how-schools-can-become-involved-in-the-new-waterloo-dispatch.pdf


Victoria Nielson, Campaign Director, Hungry for History

Supporting Partner of Waterloo 200 and Educational Advisor to the New Waterloo Dispatch

01843 581 281 / 0785 993 6865

info@hungryforhistory.info

http://www.hungryforhistory.info/ 

https://twitter.com/HforH

 


 
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TIMELINE 200 - A NATIONAL SCHOOLS' COMPETITION

Victoria Nielson - Thursday, April 09, 2015


Waterloo 200 launches a unique cross-curricular national schools’ competition:


TIMELINE 200

 

 

 

Waterloo 200, in partnership with Hungry for History, is seeking to challenge schoolchildren from across the UK to determine their 100 defining moments in history of the last 200 years from 1815-2015.


CATEGORIES: HISTORY, NATURE, ART, SPORT AND SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY


AGE GROUPS: 7-10, 11-13, 14-16, 17-18


TIMINGS: COMPETITION OPENED FRI 20TH MARCH 2015 / COMPETITION CLOSES WED 8TH JULY 2015


This is a special opportunity for the younger generation to express their ideas nationally and to leave their own legacy for future generations during these commemorations. 


TIMELINE 200 is looking to appeal to teachers and pupils across the curriculum. Individuals, teams or schools can enter as many ‘moments’ as they wish. The winning ‘moments’ will be announced during the Michaelmas Term in 2015 and entered into a national Hall of Fame. Each ‘moment’ will also be produced as a certificate, signed by the judges and presented to each winning school. 


A distinguished and famed judging panel will decide on the winning ‘100 Defining Moments’ with 20 ‘defining moments’ chosen from all of the five categories with equal representation from each age group.


Dan Snow, Historian, Writer and Presenter and a Timeline 200 judge said, "I'd like to see our history through the eyes of a child and to hear their views on our defining moments. Children tend to have no preconceived ideas. They are very perceptive and can make some amazing observations without sugar coating because they have no reason to.



DAN SNOW AT 'AN AUDIENCE WITH DAN SNOW' AT THE HOUSE OF COMMONS


Mike Diaper OBE, Executive Director, Community Sport, Sport England said, “This competition makes it possible to show how the study of sport can highlight past and present role models and encourage the younger generation of today to find a sporting hero the love and want to aspire to.”


The judging panel also includes Sir Anthony Seldon, Master of Wellington College, contemporary historian, commentator and political author; Dr Sabine Clark, President of the British Science Association’s History of Science Section; Professor Ian Swingland OBE PhD DSc, Founder of The Durrell Institute for Conservation and Ecology; Alex Hirtzel, multi-disciplined artist & art historian and Christina Nash of Radiator Arts.


Sir Anthony Seldon, Master of Wellington College said, “I have championed many causes during my career and I am delighted, in my final year as Master of Wellington College, to be a judge of this groundbreaking national schools competition. I have always encouraged young people to make their own choices and Timeline 200 allows them to do exactly that.”


For more information on how to enter the competition please visit www.timeline200.com or contact Victoria Nielson, Hungry for History

Email: info@hungryforhistory.info

 
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The Last Post Project 2015

Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, March 24, 2015


The Last Post project returns to mark Gallipoli centenary



 

Authors, actors and musicians have lent their support to the Last Post Project's ambition to get communities across the country playing the Last Post for someone in the First World War. Following a successful start that saw over 40,000 people take part in 2014, the project has now launched a free information and activity pack exploring the battle of Gallipoli.

The pack was launched at a live recording of folk songs linked to 1915 and the Gallipoli campaign. Musicians Paul Sartin of British folk band Bellowhead and Turkish singer Cigdem Aslan sang Ҫanakkale Türküsü and 'Old Gallipoli' to the tune of Mountains of Mourne.

The music will form part of the pack along with poetry, art and family stories. Actor and comedian Hugh Dennis tells of his Uncle Frank who died at Gallipoli at just 17 years old. War Horse author, Michael Morpurgo wrote the foreword in which he challenges young people to ask why and how they should remember the war.

Teachers, parents, youth workers and community groups can register for the pack at www.thelastpostproject.org.uk and to take part in a week of Last Post activities from 20th -26 April 2015.



Commenting, Virginia Crompton, Executive Producer of The Last Post project said: “The Last Post brings together music and memory to mark the First World War Centenary in an accessible and creative way. This year we are marking the Gallipoli campaign with a special focus on children, young people and families and have a wonderful introduction to our schools pack from Michael Morpurgo. We are also very proud to be working with Paul Sartin of Bellowhead and Turkish singer Cigdem Aslan to share Turkey’s Gallipoli song and other popular music from the era, connecting communities to the experiences and emotions of 1915.”

First World War Centenary Minister Helen Grant said: “The terrible loss of life at Gallipoli took away fathers, sons, friends and brothers from all nations involved in the conflict. By bringing the Gallipoli Campaign to life in the classroom with poetry, music and story telling through projects like this, we will be able to ensure an enduring legacy for those who sacrificed so much.”

The Last Post project 2015 is delivered by Arts non-profit organisation Superact and has been awarded funding from the Department of Communities and Local Government in England, the Department of Culture Arts and Leisure in Northern Ireland and the Heritage Lottery Fund to roll out the project in England and Northern Ireland in 2015.

For more information visit www.thelastpostproject.org.uk


Hibsburn School taking part in The Last Post Project

 

Butterknowle Primary, Durham performing The Last Post

 

 

About Superact
Superact is a not-for-profit Community Interest Company that uses music and the arts to develop a wide range of social impact projects. Based in the UK but with an international reach, Superact delivers a wide range of participatory creative interventions that make a positive difference in key areas of community development, skills development, employability and health and wellbeing.

About the Heritage Lottery Fund
Using money raised through the National Lottery, the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) aims to make a lasting difference for heritage, people and communities across the UK and help build a resilient heritage economy. From museums, parks and
historic places to archaeology, natural environment and cultural traditions, we invest in every part of our diverse heritage. HLF has supported over 36,000 projects with more than £6bn across the UK. In total since April 2010, HLF has awarded more than £56m to over 700 First World War Centenary projects.

About the First World War Centenary Partnership
2014 - 2018 marks the Centenary of the First World War, a landmark anniversary for Britain and the world. The First World War Centenary Partnership, led by IWM is a growing network of more than 2,900 local, regional, national and international cultural and educational organisations in 49 countries who together will be presenting a vibrant programme of cultural events and activities, and digital platforms which will enable millions of people across the world to discover more about life in the First World War. For more information visit www.1914.org

About the Department for Communities & Local Government
The Department for Communities and Local Government works to move decision making power from central government to communities, putting them in charge of local services and planning, showing them how their money is being spent, and
working to bring communities and people from all backgrounds together.

Contact:
Katharine Lane – The Last Post Project Manager
077606 60628 / 01172 140366
Katharine@superact.org.uk
 
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Magna Carta 800th Anniversary - Educational Resources

Victoria Nielson - Thursday, February 26, 2015


"The heritage of the past is the hope for the future"


"If the 800 years since Magna Carta have taught us anything, it is that when the lessons of history are learned by the young, then the mistakes of history are less likely to be repeated. The 800th anniversary of the sealing of Magna Carta will provide an enormous opportunity for seeking active engagement from schools across the globe in the areas of history, citizenship and democracy."  Magna Carta 800th Committee


Two of the core objectives of the Magna Carta 800th Committee are to increase understanding of Magna Carta’s impact on all our lives and to leave a legacy following the 800th anniversary. 


One of the main ways in which they are trying to achieve this is through the schools page on their website. This page is fast becoming the leading tool for educational resources on Magna  Carta. 



Education Books
Source: Magna Carta 800th

Resources  include:

• A series of eight Teaching Ideas for Key Stage 2 children designed by a primary school teacher across a range of key National Curriculum themes, including history, art, computing and English.

• Comprehensive bibliographies for those wanting to read more about Magna Carta aimed at both the intermediary and advanced levels of study.

• Further uploads in our series of short biographies of the 25 Magna Carta Barons.

• The first two essays by educators for Political Studies Association. These essays have been written to instigate and provoke discussion in classes. The first two cover Magna Carta’s relevance today and Magna Carta & the Human Rights Act.

• To mark the 750th anniversary of the Battle of Lewes the Houses of Parliament launched an online educational resource presenting the story of the formation of the 1265 De Montfort Parliament.


King John Seal
Source: Magna Carta 800th

FURTHER LINKS


 
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An Audience with Sir Hew Strachan - An Invitation to Kent Schools

Victoria Nielson - Thursday, January 22, 2015


EMINENT FIRST WORLD WAR HISTORIAN, PROFESSOR SIR HEW STRACHAN

WILL OFFER INSIGHTS AND ADVICE FOR SCHOOLS LOOKING TO COMMEMORATE THE FIRST WORLD WAR



Thursday, 5 March 2015 

6:30 - 7:30PM 

 

AT 

 

WELLESLEY HOUSE SCHOOL 

114 Ramsgate Road

Broadstairs 

Kent

CT10 2DG





Invitation to include pupils and/or teachers.

All ages welcome.

Limited spaces available so register early.

To reserve your school's free places on 5th March 2015 please click on the link

As part of Hungry for History’s commemorative programme, we are delighted to tell you that Professor Sir Hew Strachan is visiting Wellesley House School, Broadstairs on Thursday, 5th March 2015 to talk to local schools on ways in which they might wish to commemorate the First World War.

 

As a Chichele Professor of the History of War at All Souls College, Oxford, a member of the National Committee for the Centenary of the First World War, a Commissioner of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the author of numerous highly regarded books on war, including The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War (new edition 2014), Sir Hew is certainly one of the world’s most eminent historians.

 

Sir Hew's talk will be an opportunity for us to review the First World War afresh and ensure that the commemorations hold our school students’ interest and sustain their relevance to the modern world.

 

We are privileged to have Sir Hew able to talk to us about the journey we are undertaking and we hope that you will reserve places for both teachers and pupils.

 

Professor Sir Hew Strachan, Military Historian and Chichele Professor at Oxford:

"Obviously I believe that history has the capacity to spark a pupil's imagination, and I know too how supportive teaching both lights the fire and sustains it. Military history in particular has a special purchase: it revolves around events that can shape national histories and the shock of battle makes unusual demands on the empathy of the student."


About Sir Hew


Sir Hew Strachan FRSE FRHistS is a military historian and Chichele Professor of the History of War at All Souls College, Oxford, a member of the National Committee for the Centenary of the First World War, a Commissioner of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the author of numerous highly regarded books on war, including The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War.

 

Other professional memberships and roles


Specialist Advisor, Joint Committee on the National Security Strategy (from 2011)
CDS's Strategic Advisory Panel (from 2010)
Council, International Institute for Strategic Studies (from 2011)
National Committee for the Centenary of the First World War (from 2012)
Member, Defence Academy Advisory Board (from 2008)
Trustee, Imperial War Museum (from 2010)
Chercheur Associé, CREC-St Cyr (from 2007)
Commissioner, Commonwealth War Graves Commission (from 2006)
Director, Leverhulme Programme, Changing Character of War, University of Oxford (from 2004 to 2012)
Visiting Professor, University of Glasgow (from 2002)
Visiting Professor, Royal Norwegian Air Force Academy (from 2001)
Editor, War in History (from 1994)
Editor, Cambridge Military History series

 

Hungry for History


Hungry for History is a national schools commemorative campaign designed to instil a love of history in children & to encourage the sharing of ideas and the forging of stronger links between schools. The campaign takes its inspiration from the major anniversaries of the First World War, World War II and the Battle of Waterloo amongst others. With the emphasis on commemoration and reflection at this unique time, it aims to bring history alive, inspire the young generation of today to leave their own legacy and encourage a renewed appetite for the subject. 


Wellesley House School is both a Lead Ambassador School and Founder of Hungry for History.

 

Hungry for History is a finalist in the UKBlog Awards 2015 for both the Education and Innovation categories.

 

Twitter: @HforH

 
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An Audience with Dan Snow - An Invitation to London Schools

Victoria Nielson - Thursday, January 22, 2015


An Audience with Dan Snow
The Battle of Waterloo - A Defining Moment in European History
An Invitation to Schools in London

Date: Wednesday 4th March 2015
Time: 5pm - 6.30 pm
Place: House of Commons, London



Hungry for History is hosting this special schools event for Waterloo 200, the umbrella organisation approved and supported by Government to oversee the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo.


We welcome all London schools and those schools able to travel into Central London for this event to learn about how they can become actively involved in the commemorations.


To reserve your school's FREE places on 4th March please register HERE.

 

Maximum of 5 representatives from each school.

 

To include both pupils and/or teachers.


PLEASE INCLUDE THE NAME OF YOUR SCHOOL WITH YOUR RSVP
 

All ages welcome. 


PLEASE ARRIVE NO LATER THAN 4 .30PM AT THE SECURITY GATE SO THAT THE EVENT CAN START AT 5PM PROMPTLY

 

Dan Snow, Historian, Writer and Presenter:


"There's an extraordinary appetite for anniversaries and if you are fascinated by military history, 2015 will be a massive year. The Battle of Waterloo 1815 is one of the world's most famous and important battles. It was the climactic showdown between the military giants of the age - Napoleon and Wellington. I have written a book with my father, Peter Snow, for the 200th anniversary and I'll be at the massive reenactment on the field of battle. There is also a wonderful opportunity for London schools on 4th March 2015 where I will be speaking about this significant battle and announcing a national schools' competition called 'Timeline 200'. There will also be a opportunity for schools to learn how they can become actively involved in the bicentenary commemorations planned in London for June 2015."

 




About Dan Snow

Dan Snow is an historian who has researched, written and presented several documentaries and appears regularly on the BBC s One Show as their History Man . His writing has appeared in The Times, the Sunday Times, the Guardian, the Daily Express and BBC History Magazine. He has written Death or Victory: The Battle of Quebec and the Birth of Empire. Together Dan and his father, Peter, presented the BAFTA award-winning Battlefield Britain television series and 20th Century Battlefields, and wrote the accompanying bestselling books. He is co-founder and creative director of Ballista Digital which includes award winning apps such as @TimelineCastles, @timelineWW1 @timelineWW2 @TLCivilWar, based around timelines of historical events, with photos, videos, audio and interactive maps.

 

@thehistoryguy

 

Waterloo 200
Waterloo 200 is an umbrella organisation approved and supported by Government to oversee the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Granted charitable status in 2009 it is planning and co-coordinating the main events and pursuing an educational programme that is also seeking to create a living legacy.

 

Hungry for History

Hungry for History is a national schools commemorative campaign designed to instil a love of history in children & to encourage the sharing of ideas and the forging of stronger links between schools. The campaign takes its inspiration from the major anniversaries of the First World War, World War II and the Battle of Waterloo amongst others. With the emphasis on commemoration and reflection at this unique time, it aims to bring history alive, inspire the young generation of today to leave their own legacy and encourage a renewed appetite for the subject. Hungry for History is a supporting partner of Waterloo 200 and Educational Advisor for the New Waterloo Dispatch.

 
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An Audience with Peter Snow - An Invitation to Kent Schools

Victoria Nielson - Thursday, January 22, 2015


An Audience with Peter Snow
The Battle of Waterloo - A Defining Moment in European History
An Invitation to Schools in Kent

Date: Tuesday 17th March 2015
Time: 5pm - 6.30pm
Place: Clagett Auditorium

Canterbury Cathedral Lodge & International Study Centre,

The Precincts, Canterbury, CT1 2EH





Hungry for History is hosting this special schools event for Waterloo 200, the umbrella organisation approved and supported by Government to oversee the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo.

 

We welcome all Kent schools to this event to learn about how they can become actively involved in the commemorations.

 

To reserve your school's FREE places on 17th March please register HERE

 

To include both pupils and/or teachers.

 

PLEASE INCLUDE THE NAME OF YOUR SCHOOL WITH YOUR RSVP.

 

All ages welcome.

 

Limited spaces available so please register early. 

 

PLEASE ARRIVE NO LATER THAN 4 .45PM SO THAT THE EVENT CAN START AT 5PM PROMPTLY

 

Peter Snow, British television, radio presenter and historian:


“If there’s one moment in history – other than the defeat of Hitler – that every citizen of Europe should be encouraged to commemorate, it’s the day the Battle of Waterloo decided the shape of our continent for a hundred years. It was the final climax in the titanic struggle between the French Emperor Napoleon and the rest of Europe. It was one of the first battles to be widely reported in detail by hundreds of those who fought in it on all sides. They provide us with an unprecedented commentary on the human face of battle 200 years ago. Waterloo 200’s marking of this bicentenary gives us a unique opportunity to study one of the most seismic events in world military history. I have written a book with my son, Dan Snow, for the 200th anniversary. On 17th March, I will also be speaking about this significant battle to Kent schools and announcing a national schools’ competition called 'Timeline 200’. There will also be a opportunity for schools to learn how they can become actively involved in the bicentenary commemorations planned in Kent for June 2015.”

 

 

About Peter Snow

Peter Snow is a highly respected journalist, author and broadcaster. He was ITN’s
Diplomatic and Defence Correspondent from 1966 to 1979, and presented BBC’s
Newsnight from 1980 to 1997. An indispensable part of election nights on television,
he has also covered military matters on and off the world’s battlefields for 40 years.
He has written To War with Wellington and When Britain Burned the White House:
The 1814 Invasion of Washington.

 

Hungry for History

Hungry for History is a national schools commemorative campaign designed to instil a love of history in children & to encourage the sharing of ideas and the forging of stronger links between schools. The campaign takes its inspiration from the major anniversaries of the First World War, World War II and the Battle of Waterloo amongst others. With the emphasis on commemoration and reflection at this unique time, it aims to bring history alive, inspire the young generation of today to leave their own legacy and encourage a renewed appetite for the subject. Hungry for History is a supporting partner of Waterloo 200 and Educational Advisor for the New Waterloo Dispatch.

 

The King's School, Canterbury is a Lead Ambassador School of Hungry for History. It is organising this event alongside Wellesley House School, another Lead Ambassador School.

 

Waterloo 200

Waterloo 200 is an umbrella organisation approved and supported by Government to oversee the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Granted charitable status in 2009 it is planning and co-coordinating the main events and pursuing an educational programme that is also seeking to create a living legacy. 

 
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The Remembrance Image Project with Kingsway Junior School

Victoria Nielson - Monday, January 12, 2015


The Remembrance Image Project with Kingsway Junior School 

 

A great learning tool for those schoolchildren visiting the battlefields and memorials and also for First World War projects in the classroom.


In November of last year, Simon Gregor of the Remembrance Image Project was asked to help Year 5 students at Kingsway Junior School in Hertfordshire begin a piece of project work on the First World War. He spent half a day with them on 10 November, just before Armistice Day, and then they continued to work on the project with their teachers for the remainder of the term.

 

On 10 November, they began the morning with a whole-school assembly, in which they spent 15 minutes or so talking about the poppy, and how it came to be a symbol of remembrance. Then he spent the rest of the morning working with the Year 5 students in two groups, talking about the history of the war, and about remembrance, in more detail. They explored what they thought about the idea of remembrance, and who they wanted to remember the following day in the two-minute silence. They discussed the different backgrounds and nationalities of people who fought between 1914 and 1918, and a little bit about the conditions in which they fought.

 

The children then looked at a selection of images from the Remembrance Image Project showing WW1 sites as they look today. In small groups they talked about what the pictures showed, and decided which one they would choose as an image of remembrance.


At the close of the session, they introduced the idea of a WW1 poster, which they were going to develop with their teachers during the rest of the term. In the following weeks they studied subjects as diverse as trench life; war poetry; letters to and from the Front; war art; injuries, diseases and medical care; and songs of wartime.

 

Just before Christmas they sent Simon the fantastic posters which they had been working on over the weeks since he had last seen them [a selection shown below]. It’s inspiring to see just how creative and enthusiastic these nine- and ten-year-old students were, and the number of different aspects of WW1 life which they had engaged with in just half a term. 









 

Mrs Robinson, one of the Year 5 teachers, said, “Simon was an inspiration to our children! He captured their imaginations at the beginning of the term, filling them with enthusiasm to investigate World War One and the idea of remembrance. I would highly recommend working with him.”

If you are a school teacher and would be interested in working with the Remembrance Image Project on some work with your students – of any age – then please just get in  contact with the project. 

 

About the Remembrance Image Project


The Remembrance Image Project is a photography project which has been set up as part of the centenary commemorations for the First World War.


The aims of the project are:

* to photograph a selection of WW1 sites at or close to their 100th anniversary. Such sites may be battlefields or memorials, or locations back in the UK with a WW1 connection. The aim is to create images which are not just a record of a site at its centenary, but which capture something of the emotion or spirit of the location.

* to share these images with others, with a particular focus on schools, through exhibitions, interactive workshops, talks and other media; and in so doing to promote awareness and debate about the war and about the role of remembrance.

* to encourage others to create their own photographic images of remembrance, and to share these with the project as a means of opening up and spreading the discussion about the centenary.

The project is being run by Simon Gregor, a freelance photographer who lives in Lambeth, south London. The project currently has no external funding support, but is being self-financed. The aim is currently to make 8-10 trips to battlefield sites abroad during the 2014-18 period; as well as visiting a selection of sites within the UK.


Collaborations and partnerships

The overarching ambition of the project is to use photos taken today as a way of helping people to engage with the history of WW1, and to reflect on the role of remembrance. The project is therefore very keen to partner with others in making that happen. Already, emerging partnerships are in place with the RAF Museum, the Battlefields Trust and Lambeth Council. Discussions are ongoing with other groups, and a programme of speaking/workshop engagements is developing with groups as diverse as school groups, Women’s Institute, libraries and camera clubs.
If your school would be interested in the possibility of engaging with the project, then possible ideas include:

* provision of talks, seminars or interactive workshops for your school, tailored to your desired outcomes/learning needs

* mounting an exhibition of project images in your school

* developing a tailored image library to serve your own needs

* running an ongoing project with your school to create their own images of remembrance

* collaborating on school publications, for example if you need images for illustrativepurposes, or to accompany your own school's exhibition for the centenary

* developing battlefield school visits/tours with a creative photographic dimension


For the talks, workshops and other outreach parts of the project, schools receiving a presentation are asked to cover the costs (usually just travel); and to make a contribution of whatever they can afford towards the costs of running the project.



Hungry for History is very much in support of The Remembrance Image Project and believes it is a great learning tool for those schoolchildren visiting the battlefields and memorials and also for First World War projects in the classroom. If your school is interested, perhaps you could link up with other local schools in your area and participate in the project together?


For more information or to arrange a visit from the Remembrance Image Project, please contact Simon Gregor at www.riproject.wordpress.com Facebook: Remembrance Image Project Twitter:@rememberip

 
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English Heritage - Top Ten Anniversaries for 2015

Victoria Nielson - Saturday, January 10, 2015


English Heritage highlights top ten anniversaries for 2015


- English Heritage picks ten key historical events that will be commemorated in 2015

Waterloo, Magna Carta and Dunkirk evacuation among highlights

First World War centenary also expected to continue to be marked

 

 

The Battle of Waterloo, Magna Carta and the Dunkirk evacuation are three of the major historic anniversaries set to be marked in 2015, according to a list compiled by English Heritage, who have identified their top ten moments in our history that will be marked in the year ahead.

 

The organisation, who look after over 400 of England’s historic sites, have also identified the Battle of Agincourt and the continuing centenary commemorations of the First World War as historic moments that will be marked by events and activities throughout 2015.

 

The Battle of Waterloo, which took place on 18 June 1815, was a watershed moment in European history, with the defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte ending one of the bloodiest periods of warfare seen to that date. Next year will mark 200 years since the Duke of Wellington’s finest hour, an occasion set to be marked by a number of events at home and on the continent.

 

English Heritage will mark the bicentenary with a series at exhibitions at key locations associated with the Duke, including Apsley House and Wellington Arch in London, which will host exhibitions of objects including his hand-written battle orders and a pair of his famous ‘Wellington Boots’. Walmer Castle in Kent, where the Duke spent his final days, will tell a more personal story of the Duke and his legacy.

 


 Battle of Waterloo - Wellington Arch and Apsley House, where English Heritage exhibitions will mark 200 years since the battle.

 

June will also see nationwide celebrations marking 800 years since King John put his seal to Magna Carta, on 12 June 1215, now seen as a landmark moment in British democracy. The anniversary will be marked across the country, including ceremonies where Magna Carta was signed at Runnymede, and trails taking in associated sites such as Salisbury and Dover Castle.

 

Magna Carta - Dover Castle in Kent, which saw fierce fighting in the Civil War that arose following the signing of Magna Carta. 

 

2015 will also mark key anniversaries of both the First and Second World Wars, including 100 years since the failed Gallipolli landings, 75 years since the evacuation of Dunkirk, and 70 years since VE Day marked the end of the Second World War. Visitors can today explore the Secret Wartime Tunnels beneath Dover Castle in Kent, where the ‘miracle of Dunkirk’ was secretly planned and coordinated from.

 

 

Dunkirk evacuation - The Secret Wartime Tunnels under Dover Castle, from where Admiral Ramsey coordinated Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of Dunkirk.

 

Andrew Hann, Senior Properties Historian for English Heritage, said; “Anniversaries are an important way of helping us to reflect on some of the key moments in history that have shaped the story of our nation.”

 

“The Battle of Waterloo, Magna Carta and the Dunkirk evacuation were all watershed moments that changed the path of history, and 2015 is an ideal time to look back at these events and their impact. At English Heritage places across the country, we will be marking some of these events – and other key times from England’s history – with events and exhibitions that bring these stories to life.”

 

In addition to anniversary celebrations, English Heritage is also investing in several news project at some of England’s finest historical sites. London Art Deco gem Eltham Palace will be transformed as part of a £1.7million restoration that will open up new rooms, showcasing the 1930s glamour of the unique site, while the iconic Artillery Lookout at Dover Castle will be represented to demonstrate its First World War in guarding the English Channel.

 

English Heritage’s top ten anniversaries for 2015 are:

1) Battle of Waterloo (200) – 18 June 1815

2) Magna Carta (800) – 15 June 1215

3) Evacuation of Dunkirk (75) - 27 May to 4 June 1940

4) Battle of Agincourt (600) – 15 October 1415

5) First World War (100) – throughout 1915

6) VE Day (70) – 8 May 1945

7) Death of Sir Winston Churchill (50) - 24 January 1965

8) First English parliament (750) – 20 January 1265

9) Siege of Carlisle (700) – summer 1315

10) Viking invasion of England by Cnut (1000) – summer 1015

- Ends -

 

Further information on each anniversary can be found below.

 

For further information, please contact:

 

Phil Harper, National PR Executive, at phil.harper@english-heritage.org.ukor 0207 973 3354

Carly O’Donnell, National PR Manager, at carly.odonnell@english-heritage.org.ukor 07880 558462

 

Education

 

English Heritage provide free educational visitsto over 400 sites and expert-led Discovery Visits at selected properties. They can help you support the National Curriculum across a range of subjects and all key stages.

 

They also provide a wide range of teaching resources and free planning visits. Book your visit and use their sites to bring the past to life!

 

To learn more about free education visits please click here

 

To understand more about English Heritage's teaching resources please click here


English Heritage is the custodian of over 400 historic monuments, buildings and sites through which we bring the story of England to life for over 10 million visitors each year.

 

www.english-heritage.org.uk


2015 anniversaries in full:


Battle of Waterloo (200) – 18 June 1815

The 18 June 2015 will mark 200 years since the Battle of Waterloo; one of the most famous battles in English history. On a battlefield in Belgium, a coalition of nations led by the Duke of Wellington defeated the French forces led by Napoleon Bonaparte, in what the Duke would later call “a damned close-run thing.”


English Heritage will mark the bicentenary with a series at exhibitions across key locations associated with the victor of Waterloo, the Duke of Wellington. Apsley House in London, given to him by the grateful national, will showcase the honours given to the Duke, while nearby Wellington Arch will host an exhibition on the battle itself. Walmer Castle in Kent, where the Duke spent his final days, will re-present rooms to present a more personal view of the Duke and his legacy.

 

Magna Carta (800) – 15 June 1215

Next June will mark 800 years since King John put his seal to the Magna Carta, or ‘great charter’. Although many of its articles have since been repealed, and the agreement had little impact at the time, Magna Carta is today seen as one of the cornerstones of British democracy and law.

First signed at Runnymede in Surrey, copies of Magna Carta are today held at the British Library, Salisbury Cathedral and Lincoln Cathedral. The impact of the Barons’ War that arose out of this period can be seen at castles such as Dover Castle and Berkhamsted Castle.


Dunkirk evacuation (75) – 27 May to 4 June 1940

One of the most famous British triumphs of the Second World War emerged out of crushing defeat – the ‘miracle of Dunkirk’, which saw thousands of allied soldiers evacuated from the beaches of France. The evacuation, which took place 75 years ago, entered folklore for the actions of the ‘little ships’ that rescued soldiers and helped prevent a catastrophic defeat.

 

Codenamed Operation Dynamo, the entire evacuation was coordinated in the Secret Wartime Tunnels beneath Dover Castle. Visitors today can explore these very same tunnels, including both the rooms where operations were directed from, and a dramatic audio-visual presentation of the evacuations.


Battle of Agincourt (600) – 15 October 1415

Agincourt has entered English folklore as one of our most famous victories, helped in no small part by William Shakespeare’s portrayal of King Henry V. The battle itself was a dramatic affair, as a small army of tired archers and men-at-arms triumphed over much of French nobility on a muddy battlefield.

Although the battlefield itself it in France, the invasion was planned in England, in a campaign that allegedly began with an insulting gift of tennis balls from the French to the king at Kenilworth Castle. The invasion force gathered at Portchester Castle in Hampshire, where English Heritage will mark the anniversary in 2015.

 

First World War (100) - 1915

Following the optimism of the early days of war in 1914, when many expected to be home by Christmas, 1915 saw troops settling in for a long slog of trench warfare and new horrors. Key events taking place 100 hundred years ago this year include the first recorded use of chlorine gas, the failed Gallipoli invasion, and the start of Zeppelin attacks on England.

 

 


First World War - a First World War cavalryman

 

There are a host of places across the country to trace the impact of the First World War on the home front. English Heritage sites include Pendennis Castle in Cornwall, a centre of the coastal defence, and Wrest Park in Bedfordshire, the first country house to be transformed into a war hospital.


VE Day (70) – 8 May 1945

This year will be 70 years since the conclusion of the Second World War, an occasion marked with both relief and celebrations, resulting in widespread street parties across Britain on VE Day (8 May 1945).

 

Second World War history across Britain is widespread, with numerous places associated with the six years of warfare against Nazi Germany. Around London, there are several war memorials that mark the actions of those who fought, and lost their lives, in the conflict. 1940s era re-enactments also take place at English Heritage sites across the country, including Dover Castle and Wrest Park.


Death of Sir Winston Churchill (50) – 24 January 1965

This January will be 50 years since the death of one of the towering figures of the last century; Sir Winston Churchill. The former Prime Minister’s death in his London home was followed by a state funeral and thousands paying their respects along the route of his cortege to his burial site in Woodstock, Oxfordshire.

 


 

Death of Sir Winston Churchill - Churchill assessing troops at Kirkham Priory, Yorkshire

 

Visitors can today follow in the footsteps of Churchill at many places across the UK associated with him, and with the history of the Second World War, including his birthplace, home and his wartime cabinet rooms.

 

First English parliament (750) – 20 January 1265

Magna Carta is not the only democratic act that can be celebrated in 2015. 750 years ago, Simon de Montford, in the midst of civil war against King Henry III, called together an elected body of representatives from across England to meet at what is often consider to be the first meeting of ‘the commons’. Knights had been summoned for such a meeting before, but this was the first time boroughs had also been represented – making this possibly the first true ‘English Parliament’.

 

The conflict between Simon de Montford and Henry III became known as the Second Barons’ War, following on from the rivalries that led to Magna Carta 50 years earlier. Battles took place at Lewes and Evesham, while the siege of Kenilworth Castle that followed is famous as the longest in English history.


Siege of Carlisle (700) – summer 1315

The success of Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn opened up Northern England to Scottish raids, and one of the most famous of these took place 700 years ago. Having marched into Cumbria, the Scottish forces laid siege to Carlisle, in a bitter fight that saw ladders and siege towers used in a failed attempt to conquer the castle.

 

Carlisle Castle is believed to be the most besieged castle in England, a legacy of its proximity to the Scottish border. English Heritage will mark the anniversary this year with series of activities at the site, including a dramatic re-enactment of the siege itself.


Viking invasion of England by Cnut (1000) - 1015

Perhaps most famous for allegedly attempting to hold back the sea, King Cnut was also one of the most successful kings of Anglo-Saxon England, ushering in an age of prosperity after years of warfare between Saxons and Vikings. His victorious campaign to become king began in summer 1015, when he landed in Wessex with an invasion force.

 


Viking invasion of England - Viking re-enactors. 2015 will be 1,000 years since Cnut landed in England with an invasion force.

 

The history of Viking settlement can be seen across the country, notably in the North of England. The ‘Age of Vikings’ is often taken to have begun in 793, when a Viking raid on Lindisfarne in Northumberland caused consternation across Western Europe.

 
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Football Remembers - The 1914 Christmas Truce

Victoria Nielson - Friday, November 28, 2014


Football Remembers Week, 6-14 Dec
Getting involved is easy: play football, take a photo, tweet it. 

Football has the power to bring us together and to engage young people who would not otherwise feel part of the First World War centenary. The British Council, the Premier League, the Football League and the Football Association have joined forces in an imaginative partnership to encourage young people to remember the Christmas Truce of 1914, one of the greatest surprises of the First World War. In December 1914, thousands of soldiers around Ypres in Belgium took part in a spontaneous and informal truce - a moment of humanity from history. It was made all the more poignant as so many were to fall in battle. Football Remembers focuses on the games of football played in No Man’s Land in the context of the Christmas truce.




This is what it is about:


In the Premier League all 22 players who start the games will pose together in a group photograph as a mark of respect to those that played in the 1914 Christmas Truce match. The pictures will be uploaded to a special website.

Football Remembers want to encourage schools, children, teachers and football fans to play a game of football themselves and share their own photo via twitter with the hashtag #FootballRemembers to be displayed on the same website. They will stand shoulder to shoulder with their footballing heroes in remembering this remarkable event online.

Teachers can use this classroom resource for inspiration and a variety of ideas.

Absolutely any match of any size can be uploaded, from school to Sunday league fixtures, five-a-side matches to kick-abouts in the back garden.

Teachers can download and use the variety of activities listed in the Education Pack in order for pupils to find out more about the Christmas Truce


 


This is a real football from the First World War. It was dribbled across No Man’s Land by soldiers from the London Irish Rifles during an attack at the battle of Loos in 1915. They wanted to score a ‘goal’ in the German trenches.

Photo reproduced with the kind permission of the Curator of the Regimental Museum of the London Irish Rifles. 

Football Remembers hopes your school will select from these activities and adapt the suggestions and resources for your own use and join in this special Centenary event. But whatever else you do, encourage your pupils to think about the courage of the soldiers in the trenches in 1914. 



 
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Walter Carter - WW1 Soldier's Tale

Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, November 26, 2014


Walter Carter – WW1 Soldier's Tale 

Using today's technology to bring history to life outside the classroom 



 

In partnership with The Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Association for Greater London and Wandsworth Council, David Noble Associates Ltd has developed the story of a young man, Walter Carter from Battersea, who joins the Territorial Force in 1912 and goes to war in March 1915 as a member of 1/23rd London Regiment, following six months training. The story covers the entire War and provides not only his experiences but, importantly, those of his family, friends and girlfriend back in England. Whilst it is fictitious, it is entirely based on fact and is continuously checked by military historians both for accuracy and authenticity.



Walter



Rose



Lily



Fred


The project tells the story through the medium of Facebook and Twitter and a blog, in real time – 100 years to the day from when events happened. The main aims are:


  • * To capture the imagination of 13-18 year olds educating them about WWI using media they understand and use– media that will make it feel more recent, more relevant and importantly, accessible.

  • * To provide teachers with a welcome starting point to get pupils thinking about and seeing WWI from a number of different perspectives

  • A Soldier's Tale paints a picture of life at war and equally, life at home and reference issues that are still hugely important today – the role of the Reserves, the effect of the War on communities, the changing role of women, the impact on Service families, the badly injured and the mentally affected – but in a balanced way which includes the lighter moments of life. Virtually all posts have links to original sources for further reading.


    They have an interactive schools programme which presents the project but also involves students in thinking about and researching aspects of the War which are relevant or interesting to them – their families, schools, local community etc. They also discuss their approach to creative writing for digital media. The project is also attending a variety of WW1 events.  If you would like WW1 Soldier's Tale to visit a particular school or interest group, please contact David Noble or Diz Majores at DNA.


    Call 01235 831006 or email david@dnal.co.uk

     

    Follow Walter through his regular posts and the comments from his friends and family on

    Not on Facebook?

    Keep up with the story by reading Walter’s blog

    For those who prefer to read the story in more bite sized chunks or on the go, you can follow Walter on


    The project, which is being run on a non-profit making basis, has the support of the Departments of Education, Culture, Media and Sport, and Communities and Local Government – they are a WW1 partner with the latter Department – as well as technical support from Facebook. The Prime Minister has also sent a supportive letter saying how well the project fits in with his Centenary Programme.


    When I launched the Government’s First World
    War centenary programme in October 2012,
    I set out our key themes of remembrance, youth
    and education. This project fits in very well with
    those themes and I hope it will do much to engage
    and educate young people about the important
    events of the First World War.

    RT HON DAVID CAMERON MP
    PRIME MINISTER


    The story of Walter Carter was officially launched in June at the Army Reserve Centre in Battersea which Walter would have attended. Well attended by various Government departments, Wandsworth Councillors and the Army, it was covered by ITV News. See http://vimeo.com/londontonight/review/98016597/25aadb8526

    as well as the British Forces Broadcasting Service and a significant number of newspapers and magazines.

     

     

     
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    The Award Winning History Heroes Card Games

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, November 24, 2014


     



    A great learning tool for schools. Why not buy a pack or book a History Heroes’ WWI workshop?

     


     

    History Heroes has had a busy time since its relaunch this summer. Originally set up by Harry Hastings, and sold to Alex Ehrmann at the end of 2013, the company creates history card games designed to entertain, teach and test about who made history, how and when. Each game has 40 illustrated cards, conveying the lives in 7 facts of the 40 most significant characters in history within each theme. The basic game is won by winning the most cards. The cards are won by knowing/learning the ‘heroes’ facts. The games can be played on several different levels, as gently educational or as viciously competitive as you fancy.

     

    History Heroes brought out four new games in the summer: Explorers, Scientists, Sports Heroes and World War I Heroes. The games promptly won Junior Magazine’s award for Best Toy Design  (6+ years) and since then they’ve been bought for grown up quiz challenges, family fun, children’s learning and, even, to be used as drinking games! Another area that History Heroes is keen to develop is their use in themed, historical workshops for schools.


    Most recently History Heroes used its World War I game to deliver 3 WWI workshops to a primary school in Basingstoke. The game includes the most significant political and military leaders in WWI along with characters – some famous, some unsung heroes – who encapsulate the breadth of World War I experience. David Lloyd George ‘rubs shoulders’, therefore, with Amy Beechey – one of 2 British women documented to have lost 5 sons to the War. Commonwealth Heroes, such as Khudadad Khan and John McCrae are included along with General Arthur Currie, while the ‘Animals in WWI’, Tunnelling Companies, Canary Girls and Pals Battalions earn their own cards as do Wilhelm II and Nicholas II too.

     


    Fabian Ware's image in History Heroes' WW1 Game


    The 3 WWI workshops comprised 67 children from years 3 – 6. All the children remained receptive and engaged throughout. The children began with a fairly skimpy knowledge of World War I’s key characters – not surprising when you think about how long ago 100 years seems to a 9, 10 or even venerable 11 year old. Asked if they knew who the British & Commonwealth King had been in 1914, a few brave individuals hazarded a guess: Hitler? Hmm, not quite. Churchill was the next suggestion – a little closer – followed by Kings Roger and Hugo.


    Within minutes, however, the children had all got stuck into their various History Heroes activities, which included small groups presenting a WWI History Hero of their choice to the rest of the class. They first acted out a short play that they devised, based on the facts on the relevant History Hero’s card. Then, if the other children couldn’t guess who the WWI Hero was, the performers took it in turns to read out the facts on the Hero’s cards. It was thrilling to see groups of 8 – 11 year olds, working together to create plays about Gavrilo Princip shooting Archduke Franz Ferdinand; the sinking of RMS Lusitania and brave Billy McFadzean.


    There were aspects of WWI that were almost too alien for the children to understand. A multi-racial class, for example, struggled to comprehend that Walter Tull was the first black combat officer in the British Army despite the fact that WWI military regulations FORBADE ‘any negro or person of colour’ being an officer. The children were completely nonplussed, too, by the description of the Munitionettes as ‘Canary Girls’ due to their TNT-induced yellow skin: none of the children had ever seen or had a clue what a canary was!


    Each child took part in every aspect of History Heroes’ WWI workshops. The combination of fun quizzes, decision making, team building and public speaking made them completely unaware of how much history they were absorbing at the same time, which was a lot. It’s a great way to learn.


    For more information, please contact Alex Ehrmann at alex@historyheroes.co.uk, visit History Heroes  or follow on Twitter   and Facebook.

     

     

     
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    Canterbury Museums and Galleries - WW1 Events for Schools

    Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, November 05, 2014


    First World War Events for Schools


    Please find below the extensive WW1 schools offerings from 

    Canterbury Museums and Galleries


    In Remembrance

    Saturday 6 September to Sunday 4 January

    Free admission, the Drawing Room

    Images, objects and words from the First World War to commemorate the centenary of its outbreak, and the role played by local people, in particular Voluntary Aid Detachment nurses and The Buffs (East Kent Regiment).

    Self-guided visit with teachers notes. Free entry. Suitable for KS1-5. Curriculum links: History, Literacy, Art. To book please email beaneybookings@cantebrury.gov.uk


    Canterbury students with WW1 artefacts from the Canterbury Museum collection


    Canterbury at War

    Saturday 4 October to Sunday 9 November
    Free admission, the Front Room

    Artist and curator Patricia Wilson Smith worked closely with students to curate this centenary exhibition, which traces the course of the 'War to end all Wars', and explores the value of remembrance and the view that 'those who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it'.

    Self-guided visit with teacher notes. Free entry. Suitable for KS1-5. Curriculum links: History, Literacy, Art. To book please email beaneybookings@cantebrury.gov.uk


    Stories of the War

    Object investigation workshop

    Weekdays during term time

    The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge

    Investigate what lie was like for the people living in Canterbury during the First World War, and for local soldiers, sailors and airmen who went off to fight, in this thought-provoking hands-on session using real objects, photographs, documents and maps. Find out about local heroes, Voluntary Aid Detachment nurses who tended to the wounded, the changing role of women, what life was like for children, Zeppelin and Gotha bomber raids, and the incredible story of Britain's top air ace Mick Mannock who was bought up in Canterbury. Use the session as a stimulus for work back in the classroom, and for discussion about heroes or Remembrance.

    One hour interpreter-led session, £3 per child (minimum charge £50). Curriculum links: Key Stage 1-5 History, Literacy, Art. To book please email beaneybookings@cantebrury.gov.uk


    Canterbury at war


    First World War Creativity Workshops

    Weekdays during term time

    The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge

    Be inspired by original WW1 objects, photographs, documents and stories from the Canterbury district, then work with one of our excellent team of artists and educators to make a creative response...using art, sculpture, creative writing or poetry.

    Two hour interpreter-led session, £4 per child (minimum charge £75). Curriculum, links: Key Stage 1-4 History, Literacy, Art, Design and Technology. To book please email beaneybookings@cantebrury.gov.uk


    Create a Remembrance Poppy and/or Postcard

    Saturday 4 October 2014 to Sunday 4 January 2015

    The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge

    Create a special poppy and/or postcard in honour of a local soldier, sailor or airman who died. Dedicate it to their memory and add it to the Beaney Garden of Remembrance in the Front Room Gallery.

    20 to 30 minute self-guided activity. 50p per person to cover cost of materials. Schools and groups need to book in advance. Please call 01227 862162 or go to cantebrury-museums.co.uk

     



    Home Front Whitstable, 1914-18 Exhibition

    20 December – 4 January (except Christmas Day, Boxing Day & New Year's Day), 11am to 4:30pm

    Whitstable Museum & Gallery

    Exploring life on the British home front 1914-18 through original posters, cartoon artwork and popular arts and souvenirs. Whitstable's stories are remembered via individuals involved in recruitment drives, convalescent nursing, fundraising, rationing, supporting family on the Front, and commemorating the dead. In partnership with the British Cartoon Archive and Telling Whitstable's Story community memories group. Included in museum entry charge: adults £3; discounts £2; children free.

    Self-guided visit with teachers notes. Included in usual museum entry price. 50p per pupil for Canterbury District schools, £1 per pupil for schools and groups outside the Canterbury District. Please note the museum can be opened for visiting schools outside the advertised opening hours above. £60 for one hour visit, £85 two hour visit. Curriculum links: KS1-5 History, Literacy, Art. To book please e-mail beaneybookings@canterbury.co.uk

     

    WW1 Collections from the Autograph Book of Nurse Whistler

     

    Canterbury Museums and Galleries

    Canterbury City Council, Commissioned Services

    Canterbury Heritage Museum

    Stour Street, Canterbury

    Kent, CT1 2NR

    Tel: 01227 378 116

    Follow Canterbury Museums: @CMuseums @The_Beaney @CHeritageMuseum @CRomanMuseum @WhitsMuseum @HerneBayMuseum

    www.canterbury-museums.co.uk

     
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    Representations of the Christmas Truce

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, November 03, 2014


    A FREE one day symposium at the University of Kent 

    Organised by Gateways to the First World War.

    Friday 12 December 2014

    10am - 3pm

     

    This free symposium might be of interest to A/S and A Level students. 


    © IWM Q50719. 
    British and German troops meeting in No-Man's Land during the unofficial truce. (British troops from the Northumberland Hussars, 7th Division, Bridoux-Rouge Banc Sector)


    The Christmas Truce that occurred on the Western Front in December 1914 has achieved an iconic status and is now regarded as a poignant moment of sanity and human compassion at a time of senseless violence. But what actually happened that Christmas in France and Belgium? In this one day symposium at the University of Kent, Professor Mark Connelly, Dr Emma Hanna and Dr Peter Grant will explore the reality of that famous Yuletide and the ways in which it has been represented in British popular culture.

    Darwin Conference Suite 3. Refreshments provided. Registration opens at 9.45am.

    Places are limited and can be booked by emailing gateways@kent.ac.uk
    .

    Visit our website for more information about Gateways events.


     
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    1914 The World Remembers - Le Monde Se Souvient 1918

    Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, October 07, 2014


    An International Remembrance and Educational Project for the WW1 Centenary 



    Your school is invited to take part in an international remembrance and education project called The World Remembers. For the first time in history the names of the WWI dead from armies on both sides will be witnessed one by one: Belgian, Canadian, English, French, German, Irish etc. Our aims are remembrance, education and mutual understanding and the WWI Centenary years provide an ideal opportunity for this goal. By engaging younger generations through the use of technology and under the guidance of their teachers, we hope this broad and inclusive remembrance project will generate an interest in history and will link students to the history not only of Britain but also of other nations.

    Schools across Britain are being asked to help us create this commemoration by displaying the names of the men and women killed in WWI. The display of the names will take place in the weeks leading up to Remembrance Day in each of the WWI Centenary years, 2014 to 2018.


    WHAT YOUR SCHOOL WILL RECEIVE

    • You will receive specialized names-display software, compatible with your school computer, for each year of the project. The software will allow your school to display the names of the men who died in each year of the conflict.
    • You will receive a guide to the ways in which your school can display the names: monitors, wide screen TVs or using a school projector.
    • You will receive technical guides and tech support from The World Remembers team.
    • You will receive an education package that will contain educational backgrounders and lesson plans for your consideration.
    • You will receive design layouts for TWR posters and TWR WWI Centenary banners on which students can insert your school information and then print, display or distribute the material in their school or to their local community.
    • You will receive a series of JPEGs of WWI photographs that can be printed and included in your school’s TWR presentation.
    • You will receive a draft TWR press release that your students can add their school’s particulars about your participation and then distribute to local media.
    • You will receive original choral music, co-commissioned by TWR together with the National Arts Centre Orchestra, for your school choir. The 2014 choral piece is titled THE SONG OF THE POETS and is set to the words of Canadian, French, English and German war poets. This music will be performed by a number of Canadian and international choirs and orchestras as well as being made available for your school.
    • Your school will be linked to the national remembrance event in Confederation Square in Ottawa created by The World Remembers in partnership with the National Arts Centre.
    • Your school can be linked to other schools participating in TWR in the United Kingdom, Germany, Belgium and other nations to generate international study opportunities for students.
    • Your school will be included on our website that will make note of all participating schools across the world.
    • Your students will also be able to access the names-display on their Smart Phones and Tablets. Because the display of the names will run for ten hours a day and seven days a week for each of the project weeks, students will be able to continue to participate in the commemoration outside of school hours by viewing the names-display on the TWR website or on their personal communication devices.

    Your school can choose to participate in either one year or all of the project years. Please see ‘WHEN THE NAMES APPEAR’ for details.

    HOW THE NAMES WILL APPEAR

    The centerpiece of the project will be a display of the names of the dead from World War I. In Britain, the names of the British soldiers will be seen at the centre of the display with the names from other WWI nations appearing along the sides. Each name will only appear once in the project and no name will be repeated. Students will be able to begin to research the history of each name that appears. See THE WORLD REMEMBERS WEBSITE for details. Below on the left is an example of our names-display from our project Canada 1914-1918 Ypres that appeared in 150 Canadian schools in 2010. Below on the right is the design of the TWR Canadian names display that will commence mid October 2014.



    WHEN THE NAMES WILL APPEAR

    The name of each man or woman who died will be displayed in the 100th year after his or her death. In 2014, only the names of those killed in 1914 will appear. In 2015, only the names of those killed in 1915 will appear. And so on. Each name will be programmed to appear at an exact week, day, hour and minute in the names-display. Students will be able to utilize our website to find the exact moment when any name will appear. We anticipate the names-display will run for three consecutive weeks in 2014 and conclude November 10th. The names-display will run for approximately ten hours each day and will be switched on and off by the TWR names-display software application that you must install on a school computer.

    THE TIMING OF EACH NAME

    Each name will be displayed on the same day, hour and minute relative to each time zone. All names will be seen for a minimum of twenty-five seconds. Each name will appear at the same respective time in participating schools in the UK, Belgium, Germany and other nations. Every quarter hour all names will fade from the display and will be replaced for twenty-five seconds by a WWI photograph with relevant text. After twenty-five seconds, the photograph will fade and the names will appear once more. Our intention is that the photographs with their explanatory caption provide a context to the names.

    THE WORLD REMEMBERS WEBSITE

    The project website will be the main information source about the commemoration. The website will also display the names as they appear in your school and as they appear in other time zones across Canada and will also allow students to use our ‘Search The Names’ function to find the day, hour and minute that any particular name will appear in Canada or any other participating country. The website will provide a link from the ‘Search The Names’ result to archival sites in Canada and other nations that will allow students to explore the history behind each name. The website will provide information about Canada’s involvement in WWI and will show the name and location of each participating school on our website.

    YOUR STUDENTS & THE WORLD REMEMBERS

    Students will be able to research and study the stories of soldiers from their own school, town, city or region and they will be able to explore and study the history of other WWI nations, using the project website and links provided on it. Students will be able to connect and share research with students from other countries that are participating in The World Remembers.

    We encourage students, under the guidance of their teachers, to take ownership of the project and undertake many of the tasks of presenting the project in your school. Student teams could organize remembrance ceremonies or sunset ceremonies for the first and last day of the names-display and veterans, parents and local community members could be invited to participate in the schools remembrance activities. We ask your school for a commitment to stage the name-display for the full duration of the 2014 display period, running from October 20th until November 10th.

    Having the names appear, hour after hour, day after day in your school will be a remembrance activity in itself. The length of time needed to witness the names of those killed in WWI will help students to appreciate the enormity of the loss and the effect of that loss on Britain’s history.

    FUNDING AND CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOUR SCHOOL

    The project is free for schools in the maintained sector, though any donations to support our efforts would be gratefully received. Independent schools and universities are requested to make an annual donation of £75. Your contribution will also help us reach out to even more schools. If donors in your community wish to make a contribution to support your school’s participation, then a charitable receipt can be issued.



    THE WORLD REMEMBERS ORGANIZATION

    The World Remembers (TWR) is a Canadian non-profit organization whose purpose is to build this initiative. Our Advisory Council includes the Rt. Honourable Paul Martin - former Prime Minister of Canada, Major-General Lewis MacKenzie (Ret’d), the Rt. Honourable Adrienne Clarkson - former Governor General of Canada, Margaret MacMillan – historian and author and other prominent Canadians. We enjoy the support of Veterans Affairs Canada.



    CONTACT & FURTHER INFORMATION

    For more information please contact us at TWR@wellingtoncollege.org.uk or visit our website at http://www.theworldremembers.org/ Thank you for your time and we look forward to working with you in the coming months.

    Yours sincerely,



    RH Thomson
    Producer


    Martin Conboy
    Producer






     
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    SAHR Annual Essay Prize Competition 2015

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, October 06, 2014


    SOCIETY FOR ARMY HISTORICAL RESEARCH
    Registered Charity No. 247844

    Patron
    Field Marshall HRH The Duke of Kent KG, GCMG, GCVO, ADC(P)

    One of Britain’s oldest military history societies, the Society for Army Historical Research (SAHR) aims to encourage the study of the history and traditions of the British Army from the late middle ages to modern times.



    Annual Essay Prize Competition 2015

    The Society for Army Historical Research (SAHR) aims to identify, from appropriately submitted pieces of work, the best essay written on the History of the British Army. This includes any aspect of the Army and its activities, including its Reserve or Auxiliary formations or the civil offices and institutions which supported them. Candidates may also deal with the same material in respect of the armies of the countries of the British Empire/Commonwealth including forces maintained by non-Crown bodies within the Empire, such as the East India Company, or forces allied to and forming an integral part of the land forces operating on behalf of the Crown (First Nations/Native Americans, for example).



    This international competition, now in its fifth year, is open to both University Undergraduates and Sixth Form School Students. The Competition will award a prize of £300 for the winner and a prize of £100 for the runner-up, along with a Certificate, in each of the two classes, Sixth Form and Undergraduate. Prize winners will be invited to the subsequent Templer Medal and Prize event to be held in London in April 2015.

    The submissions should be about 3000 words in length. Additional instruction for authors, including the style guide and cover forms, can be downloaded from: http://www.sahr.co.uk/essay.html

    Essays should be submitted electronically to Dr. Ilya Berkovich at ilya.berkovich@mail.huji.ac.il by the deadline of 15 February 2015.

    Informal enquiries about the essay competition can be made to Dr.Philip Kerry at philipkerry235@btinternet.com

    "Founded in 1921, soon after the Great War of 1914-18, the Society for Army Historical Research (SAHR) is one of the oldest British military history societies and was set up to encourage the study of the history and traditions of the British Army from the late Middle Ages to modern times. The student essay prize competition (for both sixth form students and undergraduates) was first run in 2010 to foster an interest in this fascinating branch of British history among younger people. The competition provides an opportunity for students to further develop their critical writing skills whilst at the same time allowing them to explore in some depth aspects of British military History of their own choosing, which many find rewarding in itself.  In this period of anniversaries (including the centenary of the outbreak of the Great War and the bicentenary of the battle Waterloo), students may like to consider writing an essay on aspects of either of these world-defining conflicts, although the Society would be delighted to receive entries on any topic involving the British Army over the past 400-500 years or so. Prize winners receive a certificate and cheque (First prize £300, Runner-up £100) and in previous years winners have also made use of their successes to boost their applications to universities." Dr Philip Kerry

    Biographical note:
    Dr Philip Kerry, a retired pathologist since 2008, has had a lifelong interest in British military history and read for a degree in history in the 1990s purely for pleasure. He has published articles on aspects of the British Army’s involvement in the French Revolutionary/Napoleonic Wars in the Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research and currently serves on the Society’s Council.  

    Last year's winners and their chosen subjects are highlighted on the homepage of the SAHR website. Previous winners can be viewed here



    About the Society for Army Historical Research
    Established in 1921 to encourage the study of the history and traditions of the British Army, the Society for Army Historical Research is one of the nation’s oldest military history societies. Since its early days, the society has expanded its interests which now include non-regular and auxiliary British military formations such as Militia, Yeomanry, and the Territorial Army, as well as the crown offices and civil institutions that maintained them. The society also aims to encourage the scholarly study of the land forces of the Commonwealth and the Empire including forces maintained by non-Crown bodies, such as the Honourable East India Company, or forces allied to and forming an integral part of the land forces operating on behalf of the Crown.

    The Society's interests embrace the political, social and cultural aspects of army and regimental history, as well as the study of individual campaigns and commanders. The society is also interested in the study of military artefacts and pictures, uniforms, badges and medals, arms and equipment. Chronologically, the society's interests range from the late Middle Ages to the 1970s, the latter cut-off date being chosen because of the restricted availability of primary material of more recent date within the British National Archive system. 



    The main activity of the society is the publication of a quarterly peer-reviewed journal, reflecting its members' interests which are also catered for by a programme of special events and lectures. To recognize outstanding original research the society awards the Templer Medal to the author of the best book published in the preceeding year on the history of the British Army. To encourage the study of British military history among the younger generation, the society recently instituted an annual essay prize for students at universities and schools. Some modest research grants for graduate students are also available.


     
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    Waterloo Association: The Richard Holmes Memorial Prizes

    Victoria Nielson - Saturday, July 05, 2014


    The Richard Holmes Memorial Prizes


    Source: The Waterloo Association

    In 2015, Britain and Europe will commemorate the 200th anniversary of the end of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars (1792-1815). The war more or less ended with a clash of giants – on one side the Allied armies, led by the First Duke of Wellington, the Prince of Orange and Prince Marshal Blücher and on the other, the army of Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte – on the fields of what was to become Belgium, south of a little village called Waterloo.

    Source: Waterloo 200

    The Waterloo Association supports study of the Battle of Waterloo and a myriad of allied issues. It was founded by the 8th Duke of Wellington and others, in 1973. Waterloo200, an offshoot of the Waterloo Association is the official body, set up to support, network and give advice on the bicentennial commemorations.

    The Waterloo Association is to award prizes for two submissions by school students;

    Firstly, an essay competition for 11-14 year-olds (KS 3), which should consist of an account of about 2,000 words around the life and experiences of serving as a soldier in the Duke of Wellington’s Army.

    Secondly, an essay written by a student of 16-19 years (KS 5) of 3,000 to 4,000 words, on an unusual, controversial or novel aspect of the Battle of Waterloo.

    The prizes, which are to be awarded annually, from 2013 to 2016 (so covering the years 2012/13/14/15), are each entitled the ‘Richard Holmes Memorial Prize’, in memory of Professor Richard Holmes OBE, TD, who was an iconic figure in military history. He sadly died in 2010.

    Source: The Telegraph
    Professor Richard Holmes OBE

    Prizes of £150 (for 2012/13/14) and £200 in 2015 for the KS 3 project and £200 for the KS 5 essay (for 2012/13/14) and £300 in 2015, will be awarded for the best submissions by the two groups.

    The judges for both submissions have been selected from historians and teachers, who have special expertise in the essay subjects. The winners of the prizes will probably be announced in the Summer Editions of the Journal of the Waterloo Association and the winning submissions published therein.

    Both entries should be original in research and ideas.

    The submissions should be sent in electronic form to MKH Crumplin, Education Lead for Waterloo200 mickcrumplin@doctors.org.uk by Christmas Day, 2014

    Application forms can be obtained from the above person by e-mail



    ***

    “If there’s one moment in history – other than the defeat of Hitler – that every citizen of Europe should be encouraged to commemorate, it’s the day the Battle of Waterloo decided the shape of our continent for a hundred years. It was the final climax in the titanic struggle between the French Emperor Napoleon and the rest of Europe. Waterloo was one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever. It was the last great conflict of the age of the sword, cannon and musket in Western Europe. And it was one of the first battles to be widely reported in detail by hundreds of those who fought in it on all sides. They provide us with an unprecedented commentary on the human face of battle 200 years ago. Waterloo 200′s marking of this bicentenary gives us a unique opportunity to study one of the most seismic events in world military history. ” -Peter Snow


    Source: Waterloo 200
    Peter Snow

     
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    National Army Museum Nationwide Commemorative Activities

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, July 04, 2014


    NATIONAL ARMY MUSEUM LISTINGS: June 2014
    Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea, SW3 4HT 
    www.nam.ac.uk 
    0207 730 0717

    We wanted to keep you in the loop with the National Army Museum's nationwide commemorative activities whilst the Museum is closed for refurbishment. We have an extensive redevelopment project is underway


    Source: National Army Museum
    Troops in the trenches

    EXHIBITIONS:

    Outbreak! 1914

    To commemorate the centenary of the First World War the National Army Museum has partnered with six Regimental and Corps Museums to co-curate a series of temporary exhibitions exploring the early months of the War.

    Each exhibition will bring to life regional stories exploring the experiences of local regiments or corps and their roles within the British Army during the War.

    These local connections will be told through rarely seen fascinating objects and captivating stories.

    Outbreak! 1914: Wales Goes to War
    Firing Line, Cardiff Castle Museum of the Welsh Soldier
    18 June 2014 - 4 May 2015
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £12, Concession: from £9, group and family tickets available
    Address: Firing Line, Cardiff Castle Museum of the Welsh Soldier, Cardiff Castle, Cardiff, CF10 3RB


    'Outbreak! 1914: Wales Goes to War' opens at Firing Line, Cardiff Castle Museum of the Welsh Soldier

    Outbreak! 1914: Royal Engineers Go to War
    Royal Engineers Museum & Library (REMLA), Gillingham
    3 July 2014 – 22 December 2014
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £8.20, Concession: from £5.60, group and family tickets available
    Address: Prince Arthur Road, Gillingham, Kent, ME4 4UG


    Outbreak! 1914: Road to the Trenches
    Museum of the King's Royal Hussars in Lancashire
    5 July 2014 - 17 November 2014
    Ticket Prices: Free
    Address: Museum of the King's Royal Hussars in Lancashire, Museum of Lancashire, Stanley Street, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 4YP


    Outbreak! 1914: Durham Light Infantry Goes to War
    Durham Light Infantry Museum, Durham
    10 July 2014 - 22 March 2015
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £4, Concession: from £2, group and family tickets available
    Address: Durham Light Infantry Museum, Aykley Heads, Durham, DH1 5TU


    Outbreak! 1914: Staffordshire Goes to War
    Staffordshire Regiment Museum
    21 July 2014 - 18 January 2015
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £3, Concession: £2, family tickets available
    Address: The Staffordshire Regiment Museum, DMS Whittington, Whittington, Lichfield, Staffordshire, WS14 9PY


    Outbreak! 1914: Royal Fusiliers Go to War
    The Fusilier Museum, Tower of London
    4 August 2014 - 31 August 2014
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £22, Concession: from £11, family tickets available
    Address: The Fusilier Museum, RRF, HM Tower of London, London, EC3N 4AB


    YOUR COUNTRY CALLS: Enlistment to Embarkation


    Folkestone's 'Your Country Calls: Enlistment to Embarkation' opens at Folkestone Town Hall.


    24 June 2014 - 8 May 2015
    Admission is Free
    In partnership with Step Short and Folkestone Town Council

    Discover the journey undertaken by millions of men during the First World War as they left their civilian lives to take up arms and answer their country’s call.

    Explore the crucial role Folkestone played as a refuge for the thousands of Belgians who fled the German war machine. Their plight touched the British nation and prompted many men to join the war effort.

    This fascinating exhibition draws on the rich Collection of the National Army Museum along with local artefacts and stories to explore how Folkestone became a gateway between Britain and the rest of Europe.



    The opening at Folkestone Town Hall was attended by (l-r):

    • David Bownes, Head of Collections, National Army Museum
    • MP Damian Collins, on behalf of Step Short
    • Janice Murrary, Director General, National Army Museum
    • Cllr Alan North, Mayor of Folkestone
    • Rebecca McCutcheon, Interim Heritage Officer, Folkestone Town Hall


    Guestbook signed by troops as they passed through Folkestone for the Front.

    Associated events and talks

    Call to Arms
    4 August 2014

    To coincide with the unveiling of the Step Short Memorial Arch, a team of First World War interpreters will be out and about on the streets of Folkestone. Will you be answering your country’s call?


    Raising the New Army: British Recruiting Posters, 1914–15
    25 September 2014

    Speaker: David Bownes

    Steady the Buffs! The East Kent Regiment on the Western Front
    30 October 2014

    Speaker: Professor Mark Connelly

    Answering the King’s Call: Empire Forces in the First World War
    27 November 2014

    Speaker: Rob Fleming

    PIECE MAKERS

    This unique exhibition displays the artistic results of 'Piece Makers', a two-year collaboration between the National Army Museum, soldiers drawn from rehabilitation and support centres, and contemporary artist Susan Stockwell.

    A large-scale, textile-based work by Stockwell draws together pieces made by soldiers, narrative captured during the course of the project, and Stockwell’s own response to the process.

    Museum of Army Flying, Hampshire
    11 June 2014 - 24 August 2014
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £9, Concession: from £6.50, group and family tickets available
    Address: Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Stockbridge, Hampshire, SO20 8DY


    REME Museum of Technology
    9 September 2014 - 20 November 2014
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £5, Concession: from £3, group and family tickets available
    Address: REME Museum of Technology, Isaac Newton Rd, Arborfield, Reading, Berkshire, RG2 9NH

    CELEBRITY SPEAKER EVENTS:

    From September 2014, hear celebrity speakers explore the social, economic and historical aspects and influences of the British Army.
    Please note, these will take place at the Army & Navy Club, London. This is a private club and all tickets must be booked in advance via our website or ticket hotline.

    Hundred Days: The End of the Great War
    Nick Lloyd
    25 September 2014, 8.00pm

    In his groundbreaking study of the Great War, Nick Lloyd examines its last days, beginning at the heralded turning-point on the Marne in July 1918 and the next four months which included some of the bloodiest battles of the War.

    Nick Lloyd is a Senior Lecturer in Defence Studies at King's College London. He specialises in British military and imperial history in the era of the Great War.

    Ticket Prices: Standard: £10.00, Concession: £7.50
    Special offers:
    • £32.50 - Standard ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    • £30.00 - Concession ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    Address: Army & Navy Club, 36-39 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5JN
    Tickets can be booked: Online at www.nam.ac.uk/whatson, or call 020 7730 0717


    Napoleon the Great
    Andrew Roberts
    16 October 2014, 8.00pm

    As the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo approaches in 2015, historian Andrew Roberts will be revealing a true representation of Napoleon Bonaparte.

    After years of study, Roberts will be exposing the mind, the life, the military and above all political genius of this ruler.

    Ticket Prices: Standard: £10.00, Concession: £7.50
    Special offers:
    • £32.50 - Standard ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    • £30.00 - Concession ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    Address: Army & Navy Club, 36-39 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5JN
    Tickets can be booked: Online at www.nam.ac.uk/whatson, or call 020 7730 0717


    Secret Warriors: Key Scientists, Code Breakers and Propagandists of the Great War

    Taylor Downing
    20 November 2014, 8.00pm

    The Great War is often considered as a war fought in trenches, aided by brutal machinery that cost many lives. But behind this a scientific war was also being fought between engineers, chemists, physicists, doctors, mathematicians and intelligence gatherers.

    This hidden war was to make a positive and lasting contribution to how war was conducted on land, at sea and in the air, and most importantly life at home. Join author Taylor Downing for this fresh look at history.

    Ticket Prices: Standard: £10.00, Concession: £7.50
    Special offers:
    • £32.50 - Standard ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    • £30.00 - Concession ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    Address: Army & Navy Club, 36-39 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5JN
    Tickets can be booked: Online at www.nam.ac.uk/whatson, or call 020 7730 0717


    D-Day: The Last of the Liberators
    Robin Savage
    11 December 2014, 8.00pm

    Join photographer Robin Savage in conversation with an intimate group of D-Day veterans. He will be leading a conversation on the remarkable stories of some of these last surviving Normandy veterans, who are the focus of his exceptional new book 'D-Day - The Last of the Liberators'.

    Ticket Prices: Standard: £10.00, Concession: £7.50
    Special offers:
    • £32.50 - Standard ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    • £30.00 - Concession ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    Address: Army & Navy Club, 36-39 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5JN
    Tickets can be booked: Online at www.nam.ac.uk/whatson, or call 020 7730 0717


    In These Times: Living in Britain Through Napoleon's Wars

    Jenny Uglow
    29 January 2015, 8.00pm

    Join prize-winning author Jenny Uglow as she explores the many ways in which the Napoleonic Wars touched the lives of ordinary people.

    Discover the moving story of everyday people, struggling through hard times and opening new horizons that would change their country for a century ahead.

    Ticket Prices: Standard: £10.00, Concession: £7.50
    Special offers:
    • £32.50 - Standard ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    • £30.00 - Concession ticket with two-course dinner menu in the Coffee Room
    Address: Army & Navy Club, 36-39 Pall Mall, London, SW1Y 5JN
    Tickets can be booked: Online at www.nam.ac.uk/whatson, or call 020 7730 0717


    EVENTS:

    TankFest 2014

    The Tank Museum, Dorset
    28 June 2014 - 29 June 2014

    Don’t miss this unique chance to get up close and personal to the Museum's rarely seen vehicle collection.

    Our team of experts will be bringing along the Museum's handling collection encouraging you to get hands-on with our fascinating weapons and uniforms.

    Ticket Prices: Standard: £12.50, Concession: from £7.50, Family: from £28.00

    'War and Sikhs: Road to the Trenches'


    Source: National Army Museum
    Troops of a Sikh regiment marching down a tree lined road, France (?) 1914

    This summer the National Army Museum will be on the offensive at events across the country with a regiment of First World War Sikh soldiers.

    As part of our community outreach project, 'War and Sikhs: Road to the Trenches', a team of volunteers will be working with us to explore their ancestors' military pasts. Together we will be recreating the 15th Ludhiana Sikh Regiment as it was in 1914 at the outbreak of War and offering visitors the chance to handle weapons and equipment from the period.

    History Live!
    Kelmarsh Hall, Northamptonshire
    19 July 2014 - 20 July 2014
    Ticket Prices: Prices vary see http://www.english-heritage.org.uk
    Address: Kelmarsh Hall and Gardens, Kelmarsh, Northampton, Northamptonshire , NN6 9LY


    Heroes on Horseback: War and the Horse
    Scarborough Castle
    9 August 2014 - 10 August 2014
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £7, Concession: from £4.50, English Heritage Members: free
    Address: Scarborough Castle, Castle Road, Scarborough, North Yorkshire, YO11 1HY


    War and the Horse

    Dover Castle
    20 September 2014 - 21 September 2014
    Ticket Prices: Standard: £18, Concession: from £11.10, family tickets available, English Heritage Members: visit here
    Address: Dover Castle, Castle Hill, Dover, Kent, CT16 1HU

    The Best Christmas Present in the World

    Children’s novel 'The Best Christmas Present in the World', exploring the story of the Christmas truce held on the Western Front in 1914, will take centre stage in a series of hands-on learning sessions in association with City of Westminster Archives.

    In addition, a First World War interpreter will demonstrate the kit that soldiers wore at the time and encourage young attendees to get hands-on with fascinating objects from the Museum's Collection.

    Chelsea Library
    9 August 2014
    Ticket Prices: Free
    Address: Chelsea Library, Chelsea Old Town Hall, King's Road, London, SW3 5EZ

    Fulham Library
    9 September 2014
    Ticket Prices: Free
    Address: Fulham Library, 598 Fulham Road, Fulham, London, SW6 5NX

    Pimlico Library
    28 October 2014
    Ticket Prices: Free
    Address: Pimlico Library, Lupus Street, London, SW1V 3EY

    Paddington Library
    30 October 2014
    Ticket Prices: Free
    Address: Paddington Library, Porchester Road, London, W2 5DU


    LUNCHTIME LECTURES:

    From September 2014, hear guest speakers examine a wealth of enthralling topics at our free fortnightly lunchtime lectures.
    Please note, these will take place at the Army & Navy Club, London. This is a private club and all tickets must be booked in advance via our website or ticket hotline.
    Book online: www.nam.ac.uk/whatson
    Book via phone: 020 7730 0717

    4 September 2014, 12.30pm
    Zeppelin Nights: London in the First World War
    Prof Jerry White

    18 September 2014 12.30
    Thomas Cook's Tourists: The Experience of Inter-theatre Service in the British Army of the First World War
    Aimee Fox-Godden

    2 October 2014 12.30
    Artillery of the BEF: Artillery Gas
    Geoff Spring

    30 October 2014 12.30
    'No Doubt They'll Soon Get Well': Social Class and Shell Shock in the Great War
    Dr. Peter Johnston

    13 November 2014 12.30
    Born in the Furnace: Tubby Clayton and the Toc H
    Linda Parker

    27 November 2014 12.30
    All That They Had They Gave: The Men of the Western Front
    Dr Rodney Atwood

    11 December 2014 12.30
    December Attack on Passchendaele
    Michael LoCicero
     
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    Haileybury Trench Trail for schools, Autumn 2014

    Victoria Nielson - Thursday, June 26, 2014


    Haileybury to build WWI trench to commemorate centenary


    Haileybury, a leading independent school in Hertfordshire, will build a full size replica of a First World War trench on its grounds as part of its commemorative activities marking the centenary of the war’s outbreak.  This is a wonderful example of a school sharing ideas, resources and forging links with other schools during this commemorative time. 



    Trench Flyer


    The trench has been conceived as part of the ‘Haileybury Trench Trail’, which will use the school’s archive material, architecture, chapel and memorials to trace Haileybury’s historic links with the Great War and reflect on the struggles and sacrifices made both at home and at the Front during the conflict. The trench will be officially opened in September 2014 with a commemorative ceremony and the school is extending invitations to schools and museum groups to explore the trench and learn more about the history and personal stories from the war.

    Construction of the trench will start on 4 August 2014, one hundred years to the day since the outbreak of the war. Design and construction of the trench is being overseen by renowned military historian, author and curator, Andrew Robertshaw. The trench will provide a tangible illustration of the trenches which spanned the battlefields of France and Belgium, with duckboards, fire step and dugouts.



    Generated visual of the Haileybury Trench, looking into the trench (attached picture 2)
    copyright © Trenches for Teachers / www.andyrobertshaw.com


    The trench has particular significance to Haileybury, a school with substantial historical connections to the First World War. Five hundred and eighty-nine of its pupils and staff died in the conflict, and are commemorated on the school’s grounds*. The school boasts a wealth of archival material from the war, including a substantial collection of over 900 personal letters to and from Haileybury pupils and alumni at the front. The trench trail will feature stories about the school’s notable alumni including future Prime Minister Clement Atlee as well as his brother Tom, who was imprisoned for his stance as a conscientious objector during the conflict.



    Plan of the Haileybury Trench 
    copyright © Trenches for Teachers / www.andyrobertshaw.com


    Joe Davies, Master of Haileybury, said: “We felt it was important to commemorate the centenary with a learning experience that connects our pupils and visitors to the personal accounts of the war. The trench trail is a symbol of remembrance of the immense sacrifices made by our pupils at the time of the conflict. From the front line hardship of the Thorne brothers, the memorial walls, the wartime tribulation of Thomas and Clement Attlee, we hope our trench trail will provide a unique and valuable perspective on one of the most tragic and important chapters in the history of both our school and country.” 


    For full details of this incredible project and how your school can get involved, click here of contact:

    Alistair Scott / Chiara Barreca/ Alexander Burley, Broadgate Mainland
    Tel: 020 7726 6111
    Email: haileybury@broadgatemainland.com


    About Haileybury:
    Haileybury is an independent co-educational boarding school located between London and Cambridge in rural Hertfordshire. The spectacular grounds are home to outstanding facilities, excellent teaching, superb pastoral care and 770 enthusiastic boarding and day pupils.

    Founded in 1862, Haileybury is proud of its history, tradition, community and values, taking the best from the past while looking to the future. Academic rigour and outstanding co-curricular provision are at the heart of the school, offering Haileyburians a truly all-round education and ensuring they leave as confident, tolerant and ambitious individuals who are leaders and life-long learners.
    http://www.haileybury.com/ 


    Haileybury College

    About the Haileybury Trench:
    • Construction of the trench will start on 4 August 2014, on the exact day of the centenary of the start of WW1, and will be overseen by Andrew Robertshaw.

    • The trench area will cover two acres of school grounds, located in Hertford Heath (address: Haileybury, Hertford, SG13 7NU). It will include regimental aid post, duckboards, two fire steps, a gas curtain and a dugout. The trench will be equipped with replica Mills bombs (grenades), Enfield rifles, Lewis Gun (machine gun), Webley revolver and other WW1 kits such as gas masks, kit bags and mess tins.

    • The project is being lead by Russell Matcham, Outreach & Partnership Co-ordinator; Matt Radley, Head of History and Toby Parker, Honorary Archivist at Haileybury. Trenches for Teachers will carry out the building work.

    • The trench will be inaugurated in September 2014 and will be open to visiting school groups between September and December 2014. Booking required in advance.

    • The project is being funded through two generous donations to the College and funding set aside for the centenary commemorations.

    About Andrew Robertshaw:
    Andrew Robertshaw is an historian, museum curator, author, broadcaster and trained teacher who has established a national reputation for bringing the past to life.

    Andrew Robertshaw is currently working with the BBC on the centenary programme of events and broadcasts. He was previously Curator/Manager of The Royal Logistic Corps Museum in Deepcut. A Honorary lecturer at University College London and Honorary research fellow at the Centre for First World War studies at The University of Birmingham, he is also a consultant to the Belgian Association for World War Archaeology on various aspects of the identification of Great War casualties.

    Over the past fifteen years he has regularly appeared in archaeology and military series such as the BBC series 'Two Men in a Trench', Channel 4's 'Time Team’ and ‘Blood and Bullets’ for The History Channel. He is best known for the series ‘Finding the Fallen’ and ‘The Trench Detectives’. He is currently working on episodes of ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’, ‘Find My Past’ and ‘Time Team’. His most recent large-scale project was as military consultant for the feature film ‘War Horse’ Directed by Steven Spielberg.


    Andy Robertshaw BA , MA , PGCE
    ***

    Haileybury and Imperial Service College organises a huge variety of events for schools to enable their use of their wonderful campus and facilities and so that pupils can gain first-hand experience of all that Haileybury has to offer.  Please click here for other events

     
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    First World War Educational Packs by Historic Newspapers

    Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, June 03, 2014


    If you’re looking to teach students about the significance of the First World War, why not do so with an educational pack


    Source: Historic Newspapers

    To explain further, the UK’s largest private archive of old newspapers, Historic Newspapers, stock more than seven million genuine original newspapers in their ever-growing collection. 


    Source: Historic Newspapers

    Looking after the world’s biggest private archive of original newspapers means Historic Newspapers are exceptionally passionate about history. It’s for this reason they decided to select interesting and important coverage from significant historical dates – all in the name of learning – with a view to teach others about the past, as it was reported at the time.

    Best of all, they’re offering these teaching packs completely
    free of charge – all of which are available to schools, universities, libraries and accredited education establishments – to help students discover the cause and consequence of historical events. 

    A newspaper book is a wonderful way to teach children about the the First World War, as each newspaper is filled with stories from eyewitnesses who were present at the time, making it a pleasurable way to aid learning and engage a pupil’s interest and imagination. 

    The First World War newspaper book can be used to discuss the changing nature of conflict, the cooperation between countries, the shift of alliances and the lasting impact of the war on national, ethnic, cultural and religious issues.


    Source: Historic Newspapers

    A newspaper offers teachers the chance to encourage chronological understanding, evoke a sense of period and provides a framework to discuss today’s events in a historical context.

    The World War I Pack contains a book of compiled newspaper coverage, including Battle of Loos, Gallipoli Withdrawal, London Air Raid and War is Over. The other two education packs available contain complete newspaper reprints on World War II and Major Events.

    For more information please visit:

    Email: enquiries@historic-newspapers.co.uk
     
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    Letter to an Unknown Soldier

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, May 23, 2014


    BY KATE PULLINGER AND NEIL BARTLETT 
    14-18-NOW

    LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER

    A NEW KIND OF WAR MEMORIAL MADE BY THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE...



    On Platform One of Paddington Station in London, there is a statue of an unknown soldier; he’s reading a letter.

    On the hundredth anniversary of the declaration of war – in this year crowded with official remembrance and ceremony - we are inviting everyone in the country to pause, take a moment or two, and write that letter.

    All the letters the soldier receives will be published on our website, creating a new kind of war memorial – one made only of words.


    Why?

    2014 is already proving to be a year jammed-full of WW1 commemoration, but for us, it is important to move away from cenotaphs, poppies, and the imagery we associate with war memorials.

    Our project invites everyone to step back, take a few private moments to think, and make their own contribution. If you could say what you want to say about that war, with all we’ve learned since 1914, with all your own experience of life and death to hand, what would you say? If you were now able to write to the unknown soldier, a man who served and was killed during World War One, what would you write?


    Who?

    We’ve asked some well-known writers to contribute, and we’re delighted that people like Stephen Fry and Malorie Blackman, Andrew Motion and Val McDermid have agreed to join in. And we’re equally pleased that school children, pensioners, students, nurses and firemen are planning to lend their voices to this UK-wide artwork.


    When?

    Letters can be submitted now and will be published here starting on 28 June – a hundred years to the day since the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand which marked the beginning of Europe’s descent into war. The website will remain open until the night of 4 August, the centenary of the outbreak of war. Eventually the British Library will archive all the letters in their collection. Please add your voice. What you write will help provide a snapshot of what people in this country are thinking and feeling in this centenary year. Your letter will help us create a new kind of war memorial – one made entirely of words, and created by everyone.

    Neil Bartlett and Kate Pullinger



    Source: 1418now.org.uk


    LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER offers the chance to be part of a truly nationwide public artwork – a new kind of war memorial, made by thousands of people across the country.

    In just one session, participants will be able to:

    * voice their own thoughts and feelings in this WW1 centenary year
    * have their work published online, alongside the work of highly distinguished authors and poets such as Malorie Blackman, David Almond, Liz Lochhead, Andrew Motion, Val McDermid, Melvin Burgess, Owen Sheers and Caryl Churchill
    * be part of a nationwide project
    * contribute to a project that will eventually be housed as a national archive in the British Library for the benefit of future generations

    Here’s how it works;

    Lesson plans relevant to English, History, Citizenship and Creative Writing are available to download as well as resources for groups.

    The inspiration for each lesson plan is clear and strong. On Platform 1 of Paddington Station there is statue of an Unknown Soldier. The soldier is shown reading a letter, and this is the letter that we want you and your students to write.

    The lesson plans are backed up with examples of letters already written by established writers. For some tips on writing letters please click here.

    The website can receive letters now. Then, between 28th June and 4th August, the website goes fully live and students will be able to search for letters according to subject matter/region/age group and read their own letters online as well as those of their friends, family and well known people from far and wide.

    You might like to make LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER a school-wide project involving different year groups, parents and teachers.




    To contact LETTER TO AN UNKNOWN SOLDIER, please click here.

    To follow on Twitter and Facebook

    @LETTER1418 #WW1 Facebook: LETTER1418



     
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    Football Remembers The 1914 Christmas Truce

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, May 23, 2014


    By the British Council Schools Online

    Produced in partnership with the British Council Schools Online, FA, Premier League and Football League, the Football Remembers education pack is designed to offer support and resources for pupils learning about the Truce events that took place in 1914, during the First World War. 



    “It doesn’t seem right to be killing each other at Xmas time,” wrote Private William Tapp in his diary. “I don’t know what our General would say if he knew about this.”

    In December 1914, thousands of soldiers around Ypres in Belgium took part in a spontaneous and informal truce - a moment of humanity from history. It was made all the more poignant as so many were to fall in battle, including Tapp, who was killed a few weeks later.

    Football Remembers focuses on the games of football played in No Man’s Land in the context of the Christmas truce.

    Bring together and engage young people with the First World War centenary through Football Remembers


    You can:


    * download and share the pack across your school

    * use it in lessons, assemblies, cross-curriculum projects or with your partner school

    * display your results in your community and/or online

    * take part in the competition to design a war memorial (UK schools only)

    * upload and share information about the footballers or fans you research who fought in the First World War

    * organise a commemorative truce match in December.


    More details on the Football Remembers Education Pack


    The Football Remembers education pack for teachers is designed to offer support and resources for pupils learning about the Truce events that took place in 1914, during the First World War.

    It also acts as preparation for a mass participation event in December 2014. Clubs from the Premier League, Football Association and Football League, as well as community clubs and schools, will all play matches to commemorate the Truce.

    The pack contains original accounts as well as activities for developing knowledge, skills and understanding across a number of curriculum areas. These can be used in individual lessons and assemblies or form part of larger cross curriculum projects over a number of subjects. You could also use it as a foundation for a joint curriculum project with a partner school overseas.

    The activities are aimed primarily at pupils aged 9-14 but can be adapted to suit older or younger audiences studying significant historical events and people from their own locality.

    Each unit contains background information, ideas for discussion and cross-curricular activities. There are learning outcomes, links to curriculum subjects and lists of additional resources.

    The British Council Schools Online hopes your school will select from these activities and adapt the suggestions and resources for your own use and join in this special Centenary event. But whatever else you do, encourage your pupils to think about the courage of the soldiers in the trenches in 1914.

     
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    Schools and the Gallipoli Association

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, May 19, 2014






    The Gallipoli Association's Charitable Objectives are:


    To advance education for the public benefit by raising public awareness of the Gallipoli Campaign of 1915 and by encouraging and facilitating the study in the legacy and lessons of that Campaign, keeping alive the memory of the Campaign and ensuring that all who fought or served in it, and those who gave their lives, are not forgotten by applying such means as the Trustees deem fit.

    Schools across the country are to help unlock the secrets of one of the First World War’s bloodiest and most controversial campaigns. Thanks to a Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) grant of £100,000 children will study the Gallipoli Campaign in the build up to its centenary next year.


    Source: Gallipoli Association

    100 years on, evidence of the campaign is still strong. The remains of this Lighter are on W Beach



    Source: Wikipedia

    V Beach at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, 6 May 1915. View is from the bow of the collier SS River Clyde. Taken by Photographer Lt Wilfred Park RNVR (Photographic Section)accompanying 3rd WR Royal Navy Thomas McNamee.



    Source: Gallipoli 100

    Lancashire Fusiliers in the trenches at Helles, May 1915


    Teachers

    Sign up to this exciting project to explore local links with this campaign, which had a major impact on 20th Century history and has helped to define different national identities across the globe.

    Here is what you can do:


    * Join one of 7 regional partnerships, working with museums, archives, regimental associations and serving regiments across the UK.

    * Work with freelance arts teachers to develop creative ideas (e.g. film, drama, photography, music).

    * Engage with local experts and historians to bring Gallipoli to life for your pupils.

    * Sign up to our website, where your school can share stories and debate with schools in Britain, Turkey, Australia, New Zealand, France, Ireland, Germany, India, Senegal and Canada.

    * Take part in a schools conference on Gallipoli in 2015

    * Look out for educational visits to Gallipoli in 2014 and 2015, subject to funding.

    To express interest in any of the above, please contact the Gallipoli Association at contactus@gallipoli.co.uk



    Source: Gallipoli 100

    Submarine E11 returning from the Dardanelles after a successful patrol (Supplied by Stephen Chambers Collection)

    Follow on Twitter and Facebook
     
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    Kent schools eager to take part in Waterloo commemorations

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, May 16, 2014


    Teachers and school pupils from across Kent attended an event at Wellesley House School, Broadstairs on Tuesday 13th May to learn about the Battle of Waterloo Commemorations in 2015.




    The event, which was organised by ‘Hungry for History’, a national schools campaign, took place just over a year before the official commemorations of the Battle of Waterloo in June 2015. Teachers and pupils learned about how the news of the Waterloo victory was brought ashore at Broadstairs, in East Kent and was taken through Kent and into London.

    This journey is the inspiration for the New Waterloo Dispatch, a ceremonial interpretation of how the news was delivered. The talk also provided an opportunity for teachers and pupils to understand how they can get involved in the New Waterloo Dispatch in Kent next year and what educational material is available for the classroom.

    During the event, a variety of guest speakers highlighted the significance of the Waterloo campaign as a defining moment in European history. The battle involved over 200,000 soldiers, of whom 47,000 died with 24,000 others wounded. It ended a long period of war and instability, heralding peace and change across Europe, which still affects us today. Following an introduction from Simon O’Malley, Headmaster, speakers included the Chairman and other senior representatives of Waterloo 200, the official body masterminding the international commemorative programme.

    With the embarkation of the Duke of Wellington’s troops and stores from Ramsgate during the Napoleonic wars and the first news of the Waterloo victory having been brought ashore at Broadstairs, carried through Kent and into London, this period of European history holds a particular significance for the local area. 

    In conclusion at the educational talk, Viscount De L’Isle, Lord-Lieutenant of Kent said,
    “As the Queen’s Representative in Kent I am delighted to endorse this excellent move to bring a deeper sense of our national heritage to our young people. My impression is that ‘Hungry for History’ is being tackled in a way which will catch the imagination, generate curiosity and inspire a new generation to understand the bedrock of our nation.”


    Lord Lieutenant of Kent
    Photo courtesy of JamesHeming.com

    Major General Sir Evelyn Webb-Carter, Chairman of Waterloo 200 speaking at the talk said,
    “Waterloo represents a pivotal moment in European history for us all. The events of 1815 have truly shaped the face of Europe, our relationship with our European cousins and our ideas of what it means to be ‘European’. As we near the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, we have a fantastic opportunity to keep this rich history alive for the next generation and beyond.”


    Major General Sir Evelyn Webb-Carter KCVO OBE, Chairman Waterloo 200
    Photo courtesy of JamesHeming.com

    Following the event, a dinner was held at The Empire Room at the Royal Harbour Hotel, Ramsgate. The dinner was hosted by restaurant owner, James Thomas and included attendance by distinguished guests and friends of Waterloo 200, such as prominent historian, Professor David Starkey.”


    Dr David Starkey talking to the High Sheriff of Kent
    Photo courtesy of JamesHeming.com

    Preparations are already underway for commemorative events across Europe in 2015 and special events – more details to be announced later in the year via Waterloo 200 and Hungry for History – have been planned for Kent. 

    For more information please visit www.waterloo200.org.

    If your school would like to get involved in the Waterloo 200 commemorations, please register via Hungry for History at info@hungryforhistory.info who are coordinating schools involvement as a supporting partner of Waterloo 200

    ***

    For more information contact:
    Victoria Nielson (Hungry for History)
    Number: 01843 581 281
    Email: info@hungryforhistory.info

    Tom Reynolds (Waterloo 200)
    Number: 020 7593 4000
    Email: tom.reynolds@madano.com

    About Hungry for History

    Hungry for History is a national schools commemorative campaign designed to instil a love of history in children & to encourage the sharing of ideas and the forging of links between schools. The campaign takes its inspiration from the major anniversaries of the First World War, World War II and the Battle of Waterloo amongst others. With the emphasis on commemoration and reflection at this unique time, it aims to bring history alive, inspire the young generation of today and encourage a renewed appetite for the subject.

    About Waterloo 200

    Waterloo 200 is an umbrella organisation approved and supported by Government to oversee the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Granted charitable status in 2009 it is planning and co-ordinating the main events and pursuing an educational programme that is also seeking to create a living legacy.

    About The Empire Room Restaurant

    The Empire Room, based in the fine Georgian buildings of the fabulous Royal Harbour Hotel, Nelson Crescent, has recently opened its doors in the heart of Ramsgate, close to the Royal Harbour. The 30 cover Empire Room restaurant serves classic British dishes in a club setting. Open Monday to Saturday 6.30pm to 9.30pm (last orders) and on Sunday’s from 12.30pm to 2.30pm, it offers an inviting new place to eat in a great location, with an emphasis on comfort, service and wonderful food. The Royal Harbour Hotel, Ramsgate is a delightful quirky 27-bedroom townhouse hotel that stands on a Georgian crescent with magnificent views of the harbour and sea. Simplicity, elegance and eccentricity go hand in hand and this has now extended to its new restaurant.

    About Wellesley House School
    Wellesley House is an independent preparatory boarding school on the Kent coast established in 1898. Wellesley focuses on academic excellence, a broad curriculum and the full boarding experience. Wellesley offers small classes, superb facilities and a dedicated teaching staff, plus a full programme of activities and weekend outings. Traditional links with leading senior schools are maintained and, in the last few years, children have won a range of scholarships. Current Headmaster, Simon O'Malley, was appointed in 2006 and the school is thriving under his leadership.

     
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    Uppingham School's Re-Dedication Story for the First World War

    Victoria Nielson - Thursday, May 15, 2014


    A rather fascinating story in regards to an honour roll board that was lost and then found, and now restored to its original boarding house at Uppingham School in time for the Centenary.

    Rededication of the Uppingham Lower School World War 1 Roll of Honour and Memorial Board.

    This is part of Uppingham's  ongoing mission to return/create honour roll boards for all the last few boarding houses without one during this commemorative period.

    April 27th 2014 saw the return from a ninety four year exile of this large WW1 Memorial Board.



    Lodge Memorial Board

    One of the At Risk War Memorial Project Directors, Denis Kenyon had been familiar with this board since 1980 because he had noticed it hanging in a corridor at Nevill Holt Preparatory School, where his sons were.

    But because the heading merely says “OLD BOYS”, the general assumption by everyone was that it was the Nevill Holt school board. The truth is far more interesting.

    Nevill Holt School closed in 1998 and the Hall sold to a private buyer. Shortly afterwards the board was stored in St Mary’s Church, Nevill Holt, which is where Denis Kenyon saw it again in 2012 propped against a wall.

    With a bit of research and a lot of luck the real history was unveiled. In the early 1900s, housemasters at public schools owned their own boarding houses which they ran as separate businesses from the educational side of the school.

    In 1919 Uppingham Lower School was owned by a Reverend Bowlker. Following a disagreement with the then Headmaster of Uppingham School, he removed the boys, their beds and the Board to Nevill Holt Hall which had been empty for eight years and set up a new establishment, Nevill Holt Preparatory School, severing all formal links with Uppingham School.

    The original Lower School buildings became The Lodge, now Uppingham School’s sixth form girl’s boarding house.

    When Denis Kenyon approached Drs Stephan and Kyi Muller, the housemaster and housemistress of The Lodge with this story, they were extremely enthusiastic to have it returned to its rightful home.

    So on Sunday 27th April 2014 a rededication ceremony took place in the dining hall where the Board is proudly mounted. There were at least 65 people present including the Headmaster of Uppingham School, representatives of the Combined Cadet Force, representatives of all the other school Houses and the girls from The Lodge.


    Rededication Ceremony of Lodge Memorial Board

    Dr Stephan Muller spoke a few words and Denis Kenyon responded by saying how pleased the At Risk War Memorials Project was to have been able to assist in this happy outcome.

    The Chaplain gave a short address with prayers and a most accomplished pupil sounded the Last Post and, after a minute’s silence, The Reveille.

    The Board had come home.


    Denis Kenyon
    29th April 2014.

    Uppingham School is a co-educational independent school situated in the small market town of Uppingham in Rutland, England. The school was founded in 1584 by Robert Johnson, the Archdeacon of Leicester who also established Oakham School.

    The school's current Headmaster, Richard Harman M.A., is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference and the school is a member of the Rugby Group of independent schools in the United Kingdom.

    The Reverend Edward Thring (headmaster 1853–1887) was perhaps the school's best-known headmaster. His changes to the school's curriculum were later adopted in other English public schools. During his headship the school moved temporarily to Borth in Wales after an outbreak of typhoid ravaged the town. The move to Borth is commemorated in an annual service, held in the school chapel.

    John Wolfenden, headmaster from 1934–1944, was notable for later chairing the Wolfenden Committee whose report recommending the decriminalisation of homosexuality, was published in 1957.

    Uppingham has a tradition of high musical standards, based on the work of Paul David and Robert Sterndale Bennett and has opened a new music school, a fusion of new and old buildings named after the first Director of Music, Paul David. The current Director of Music is Stephen Williams.

    Uppingham has the greatest area of playing fields of any school in England, in three separate areas on different sides of the town: the Leicester to the West, the Middle to the South, and the Upper to the East.

    Uppingham is a Lead Ambassador School for Hungry for History





     
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    "El Toison de Oro"

    Victoria Nielson - Thursday, May 08, 2014


    The Duke of Wellington was presented in 1812 with the “El Toison de Oro” by the Spanish Parliament - the greatest Spanish prize to a foreign man.

    The Woodcote House Hungry for History Committee recently discussed the idea of historical commemoration and decided to start their investigations close to home. Each boy brought in details of a family event or piece of historical memorabilia that could be researched. Ricardo Guisado showed the committee the El Toison de Oro which had come into his family. It had been used in his home town as part of a local commemoration of the end of the Peninsula Wars in 1814. This particular award was presented to the Duke of Wellington following The Battle of Salamanca in 1812. A selection of the boys’ research and findings appears below.

    ***

    The document that my family has is a document were the Spanish parliament gives the Duke of Wellington “El Toison de Oro” the greatest Spanish prize to a foreign man.

    Why does my family have this document?

    My Grandparents have this document because their daughter-in-law had a grandfather who was a Cavalry Colonel and a history teacher in the University of Toledo. He collected history documents. He bought the document from a museum.

    What is “El Toison de Oro”?

    The Illustrious Order of the Golden Fleece is an order of chivalry founded in 1429 by the Duke of Burgundy and Count of Flanders , Philip III of Burgundy . It is one of the most prestigious orders and oldest in Europe, it is closely linked to the Habsburg dynasty and the crowns of Austria and Spain .

    In the Spanish war of independence The Spanish King decided to give it to Napoleon, but then quickly decided not to! After the Spanish won the war the Spanish King gave it to Wellington.

    The Order of the Golden Fleece

    The Order of the Golden Fleece is similar to the Knights of the Garter in Britain. It was founded by Phillip the Good, Duke of Burgundy and the Count of Flanders. Here is a picture of the Golden Fleece.



    What happened at Salamanca?

    1) The battle was fought between the Duke of Wellington & Auguste de Marmont.

    2) They were fighting on rough sandy terrain. This meant the cannons and horses could get stuck in the sand. De Marmont was in charge of the French guns.

    3) The battle which raged that day is famous as a defining moment in military history; many thousands of men were slaughtered by cannon fire in the space of only a few short hours.

    4) Wellington won.



    Who was Auguste de Marmont and how did he ‘help’ Wellington win El Toison de Oro?



    1) Was born at Châtillon-sur-Seine

    2) His father was an ex officer in the army

    3) Married Hortense de Pereux in 1798

    4) Stayed loyal to the restored Bourbon king Louis XVIII

    5) In 1801 Auguste was now inspector-general of the artillery

    6) 22nd of July 1812 The battle of Salamanca. Marmont was defeated by Wellington. Wellington was presented with the “El Toison de Oro”.

    7) However, he is best known for deserting Napoleon in 1814.

    8) He stayed loyal to the king during ‘The 100 Days’.

    9) Following Waterloo he voted in favor of the execution of Marshal Ney.


    The research for this article was carried out by Henry Lozinski, Ricardo Guisado, Torin Cooper-West, Moyin Eyiowuawi and Rufus Matthews of Woodcote House School
     
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    Waterloo 200 - An Invitation to Schools in Kent - 13 May 2014

    Victoria Nielson - Sunday, May 04, 2014


    In addition to various anniversaries of WW1 and WW2 there is also another important commemoration being planned in which Hungry for History will be getting involved:

    2015 is the 200th Anniversary of The Battle of Waterloo - "A Defining Moment in European History" www.waterloo200.org

    Waterloo 200 is an umbrella organisation approved and supported by Government to oversee the commemorations of the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. 




    The battle of Waterloo was a milestone in European history. It ended over 20 years of conflict in Europe. It involved many nations and heralded over 50 years of peace and stability. The battle was the culmination of a long campaign, fought in Spain and Portugal, by the Duke of Wellington and his allied armies. The commemoration of this seminal event will reflect the strategy and planning of the campaign in a modern context and will involve people of many nations. It will celebrate the idea that is Europe. 


    British infantry in square resisting one of many attacks from French cavalry.

    Waterloo 200 has been established to direct and manage this unique International project. From the first action of the Peninsular War in 1808 at Rolica in Portugal, to the final battle at Waterloo in Belgium seven years later, Waterloo 200 will track and guide organisations and people who wish to be involved.  Hungry for History is one of Waterloo 200's fortunate partners contributing to these commemorations and details of how schools can become involved in Kent will be highlighted in this Educational Talk on Tuesday 13 May. Details of how schools can get involved in London during June 2015 will be made available in due course.  In the meantime, if you would like to get involved, please contact us via the General Message Form or email info@hungryforhistory.info

    Major General Sir Evelyn Webb-Carter KCVO OBE and Chairman of Waterloo 200 said: "Great historic events form part of our cultural memory even if we were not present to witness them. They are part of our national story and the catalyst for understanding our place in the world. The Battle of Waterloo is one of these great events and a defining moment in European history. Reaching out to younger generations is essential if its significance is to be recognised and understood and the Hungry for History campaign is an invigorating way of achieving this legacy, not only for Waterloo but for other great historic events as well.”

    Peter Snow, British television, radio presenter and historian said “If there’s one moment in history – other than the defeat of Hitler – that every citizen of Europe should be encouraged to commemorate, it’s the day the Battle of Waterloo decided the shape of our continent for a hundred years. It was the final climax in the titanic struggle between the French Emperor Napoleon and the rest of Europe. Waterloo was one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever. It was the last great conflict of the age of the sword, cannon and musket in Western Europe. And it was one of the first battles to be widely reported in detail by hundreds of those who fought in it on all sides. They provide us with an unprecedented commentary on the human face of battle 200 years ago. Waterloo 200′s marking of this bicentenary gives us a unique opportunity to study one of the most seismic events in world military history. ” 

    LIMITED SPACES AVAILABLE SO BOOK EARLY

    TO RESERVE YOUR SCHOOL'S THREE FREE PLACES ON 13 MAY PLEASE EMAIL INFO@HUNGRYFORHISTORY.INFO

     
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    My trip to Penshurst Place by Anna Bowring (Aged 10)

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, April 07, 2014


    The below is another blog written by Anna Bowring (age 10) who is in Year 5 at Rose Hill School, Tunbridge Wells. Anna previously wrote about The Golden Hinde.


    Rose Hill School is a British Independent School situated in Tunbridge Wells, Kent. It is a member of the Independent Association of Preparatory Schools. The school is co-educational for ages 3 - 13.

    My Trip to Penshurst Place

    On Tuesday 17th March I went with my school to Penshurst Place. Penshurst Place belongs to the Sidney family, who still live there today. First of all we met a tour guide by the gates of the house. We learnt about the Sidney family symbols and the Medieval sign for hospitality. 


    Penshurst Place Source: Wikipedia

    The Sidney family used to just have one symbol which was the arrowhead, but when one of the Sidney family members married Mary Dudley their symbol was a bear holding a tree. Later it became the one we are most familliar with today, the porcipine. Underneath the symbols was a man decorated with vine leaves on his head and wine pouring out from his ears. This was the sign of hospitality in Medieval times, but later in Tudor times this was the pineapple.

    We we went into the house and entered a room were a person pretended to be a lady in waiting. She told us all about Tudor clothes. She told us their were laws about clothes. For instance, a middle class lady with enough money to buy upper class clothes would break the law if she wore them, because she is middle class and not allowed to look more important than she is. Another law was that in 1571 when the wool industry was doing very badly, Parliament passed a law saying that everyone had to have a woolly hat. After that she told us about how rich ladies dressed, first you would put on your underwear, then you put on your corset which is something that tightens your tummy so that you look slimmer. After that you would put on a bum role which makes your bum look bigger, then you would put on stockings which go up to your knees, after that you would put on an underskirt, then you would put on something that looks like a skirt but it doesn't go all the way around you, so you could still see a bit of the underskirt. Then you would put on an item that looks like a t-shirt with buttons on so you could clip it up to you, then a cuff which is like a collar with frills in it. Most rich ladies would tie their hair back into a bun and dye it ginger like Queen Elizabeth For men they would have to put on underwear, something that looks like shorts with frills in them, a top decorated with fine fabrics and then a cuff.

    We then went to see a Spanish prisoner he had cannon balls chained to his feet and was in a room with only a small window. He was a sailor of the Spanish fleet in the first Spanish Armada (there were five attempts to overthrow Elizabeth 1.) He told us they had left the Spanish Coast in 1588 they had to go back to Spain for repairs from bad storms. When they sailed again in April they docked at France at the night for repairs. This is when Drake seized his chance and set fire to eight ships and sailed them towards the Spanish, the Spanish panicked because they had lots of gunpowder and the fire could blow their ships. The Spanish sailed back round Scotland where the weather destroyed them. When Elizabeth heard the news she was eating goose and that is why we eat goose on Christmas day. On board the Spanish ships you would have to eat things like biscuits covered with maggots. Uh!

    We then went to a man who told us about weapons. In Tudor army there were two types of army, there was the military army( full time soldiers), and the non military army( part time soldiers.) The Tudors had different types of weapons like an longbow and pike. We found out that the Spanish were very good sword fighters, they had different types of sword for the better solider you are ( I got to hold the best sword.) The English would defend themselves with pikes they would point the pike out so the Spanish couldn't use their swords and the English would cut out their throat. The most deadly pike was the Bill Pike it was called this because it was shaped like a birds bill.

    After that we went in the kitchens, the first things we found out is that the Tudors ate peacock, ox and vixen. They would have a great big fire and a spit boy would be paid to turn the spit, he might have to turn the spit for nearly six hours. We then found out about drink, we found out that beer and ale was the best type of drink they even had toddler ale for toddlers. Water was bad because the Tudors threw all their poo and wee in the rivers so it was very unhealthy. Milk was bad because it would become dirty in the summer. Wine was good but only rich people could afford it. After that we found out that Tudors only ate with a knife and spoon. Tudors had different types of plates like for sea they would have a wooden block with a plate carved in it. Most Tudors though had hard stale bread and afterwards a boy would take all the stale breads and give them to the poor.

    We then went to the Great Hall to learn about manners and music. We were told about the bagpipes which was a bit like a bit like a one man band instrument. We then found out about a Sitan which originated from a Sitar, the man played Greensleeves and he told us that people think that Henry VIII wrote it, but it was an old folk song. Henry just added on words and played it to Anne Boleyn. We then learnt about curtsey, boys had to bow by putting their left leg behind and bowed, the girls did the same thing but nodded their head at the same time. We then learnt a traditional Tudor dance.

    After that we went to see the barber, the barber could also do surgery on you but he could not give you every type of medicine. We learnt that if you had a headache you have a bit of bone from your brain pulled out with a tool that looks like a knife crossed with a spoon. If you were shot with an Musketeer bullet by the arm the barber would poke around with a long stick in there. When he finds the bullet he will get his tweezers and pull the bullet out. After that to stop all the bleeding he would press with a red hot poker. Finally we went to find out about punishments. The person who decides the punishments is called the bellboy. There are different types of punishments like being put in the stocks, branded and being executed. Some crimes were like chatting too much or being a beggar. If it is a more serious crime you would get executed. You might be burnt at the stake or shot at dawn. Some punishments were there to embarrass you though, like having people throw rotten fruit at you.

    On the way back people were saying that it was one of the best trips ever! Thank you to everyone who organised it!


    For more information on school trips to Penshurst Place please click here

    Located in West Kent in the South East of England, Penshurst Place is close to the major roads in West Kent. Take junction 5 of the M25 and A21/A26.



     
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    The Chorley Memorial Book

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, March 17, 2014


    WRITTEN BY: Adam Cree, History Department, Saint Michael's CE High School, Chorley

    I am a history teacher at St Michael's CE High School in Chorley. I am also a volunteer at Astley Hall, a Tudor hall and museum in Chorley.

    The Chorley Memorial Book


    I have been cataloguing a Memorial Book compiled 1919-21 which is held in at Astley Hall and records a uniquely printed biography of the town's 775 casualties, each paired as comrades from their parish churches. There are 450 photographs. There are also 2000 signatures, not from the town but from "the great and the good" of the era across 2 continents (an a few from elsewhere). Pontiffs, archbishops, generals, field marshals, presidents, princes, monarchs, prime ministers, secretaries of state, and ex-servicemen from the allied nations have underwritten our Memorial Album. This has been a 7-year research programme in the making.


    Source: Chorley Council
    Astley Hall, Chorley


    Front Page of the  Chorley Memorial Book


    A casualty shown in the Chorley Memorial Book

    For the pupils at St Michael's CE High School, our 220 Year 9 pupils have been given one name each from a spreadsheet I have created. Each pupil has built up a biography of the casualty, and then researched the context of occupation, enlistment, fields of combat and context of their death. This has allowed them to link the micro and macro, from local to global themes. Once pupils have completed this they have been encouraged to use filters on the developing spreadsheet to make connections with other individuals to build up the social and service relationships. Who went to your casualty's church? Who was in your regiment? Battalion? Who joined up on the same day? Who died on the same day? Who lived on the same street? 

    For an example of the spreadsheet, please contact me at ACREE@saint-michaels.lancs.sch.uk

    The pupils have been encouraged to look at the impact on the community of Chorley as well as the wider context of battles and politics. It is possible to make a connection to every theatre of conflict and every service. One example is of a service record of an individual who was an estate manager of a local "big house" who joined the Railway Operations Division of the Royal Engineers and was killed when an enemy aircraft dropped and explosive device. Pupils are exploring the impact on families after the war, too, which was of great interest to the compiler.

    The pupils are compiling their profiles on a web-based platform called Mahara (connected to our VLE). They are sharing their stories out loud or in a forum to share URLs and then connect their pages together where some of the above questions intersect. They are recreating a web of relationships which existed in 1914, or grew over that period, and were obliterated by 1920.


    Source: St Michael's CofE School Site
    St Michael’s Church of England High School

    The school wanted to share this with Hungry for History as we thought it is worth encouraging other schools to make a spreadsheet of their local memorials and then filter and cross-reference to build up the community of the lost generation of 1914-18.​



     
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    International Poetry Competition in commemoration of Wilfred Owen

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, March 10, 2014


    To mark the Centenary of the outbreak of WW1, The Wilfred Owen Association has launched an International Poetry Competition in commemoration of Wilfred Owen. 


    Source: Wikipedia

    Owen is acknowledged across the world as one of the greatest and most significant of the First World War poets for the power and poignancy of his work. Philip Larkin described him as “an original and unforgettable poet … the spokesman of a deep and unaffected compassion”. His poetry retains its relevance and universal appeal; it is certainly much more widely read and appreciated now than at any time since his death. In this, the Centenary year, the competition judges are looking for poems “in the spirit of Wilfred Owen”.

    The top prize is £500. There are also runners-up prizes and a special young people’s prize of £250 for the best poem by a poet under 19 years.

    Deadline for entry is 30 June 2014.

    If you think this competition may be of interest to your school, The Wilfred Owen Association can send you some posters to display in your classrooms. Posters, entry forms and full details are also on their website. For more information please click here.


    Source: Wikipedia
    Anthem for Doomed Youth" by Wilfred Owen


    Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) is widely recognised as one of the greatest voices of the First World War. His self-appointed task was to speak for the men in his care, to show the 'Pity of War'.

    Owen's enduring and influential poetry is evidence of his bleak realism, his energy and indignation, his compassion and his great technical skill.

    The Wilfred Owen Association was formed in 1989 to commemorate Wilfred Owen's life and work.



     
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    The Golden Hinde by Anna Bowring (Aged 10)

    Victoria Nielson - Sunday, March 09, 2014


    The below has been written by Anna Bowring (age 10) who is in Year 5 at Rose Hill School, Tunbridge Wells. 

    Rose Hill School is a British Independent School situated in Tunbridge Wells, Kent. It is a member of the Independent Association of Preparatory Schools. The school is co-educational for ages 3 - 13.

    The idea came to Anna to write a blog for us because shortly she will be going on a school visit to the Golden Hinde. Rose Hill have been studying Tudor explorers at school and she found it so interesting she wanted to write something for Hungry for History to share with other pupils:

    ***

    The Golden Hinde was the ship that Sir Francis Drake and his crew used to circumnavigate the world. 


    The Golden Hind reconstruction Source: Wikipedia

    In 1577 Sir Francis Drake decided to become the first Englishman to sail around the world. He took five ships with him and the Golden Hinde was the ship that carried Drake. They started at the River Thames, sailed to Portsmouth to collect food and water. After that Drake sailed to North America and then down to South America. In South America, he stole several Spanish ships which were packed with precious items such as gold. He took the ships by raising a Spanish flag on all his ships so he tricked the Spanish crews. As Spanish sailed passed Drake, the English fired cannons and boarded the Spanish ships. During this period Drake had round about half a million pounds altogether. After this Drake was starting to wonder where he was. The compasses in Elizabethan times were not very good, and sailors had to find out a direction using an astrolabe to measure the height of the sun at midday in order to find out how far North or South they were. the problem was that they had no idea how far East or West they were. Drake was determined to not go back the way he came, and continued down to countries he had never heard of, for example Australia and New Zealand. 


    Sir Francis Drake by Henry Bone Source: Wikipedia

    Now came the challenge, Drake had to pass the roughest seas. During this time all 4 other ships sank, and the Golden Hind nearly sank. It was a foggy day and Sir Francis Drake and his remaining crew, were sailing into some big rocks. When Drake realized this he and his crew had to quickly unload the cannons, so the ship was lighter. Fortunately the Golden Hind didn't sink. After passing the rough seas drake came to countries like China. Finally in 1581 Drake came back into the River Thames. 

    The first thing he did was ask who the monarch was, because he had been voyaging for four years and Queen Elizabeth could have died and the Spanish taken over, and he would have been for the chop. Luckily Elizabeth was still alive. When Drake told Elizabeth that the voyage was successful and all the treasure he had stolen, Elizabeth declared that he should keep the treasures as his reward. Later on Sir Francis Drake became very famous,rich and he also got a knighthood. 

    What Can You Do? 

    You could go and see the Golden Hind. It is docked in the River Thames, near the Globe Theatre. You could also go on a school trip and see it like me, because I am going on Friday with my school to see it...

    ***

    The following is by Anna after she had visited the Golden Hinde



    My Trip to the Golden Hinde On Friday 7th March 

    I went with my school went to the Golden Hinde. We got on a train at Tunbridge Wells, when we arrived at London, we saw and took pictures of famous landmarks like the London Eye, Milllenium Bridge, Westminster Abbey, Big Ben, Houses of Parliament and my favourite, the Globe Theatre. The Globe Theatre was William Shakespeare's theatre which burned down three times. 

    When we finally got to the Golden Hinde, a man who was dressed as an Elizabethan sailor met us. He explained that this was a replica of the Golden Hinde. The Golden Hinde was originally called the Pelican. Drake changed it to the Golden Hinde to bring them luck and because they stole lots of Spanish gold and silver. We saw that at the top of the ship was a golden Hinde (or a female deer.) The sailors used the part by the mast as the toilet and the youngest boys of the age 11or 12 had to scrub off any poo stains. In Elizabethan time only boys were allowed to sail. They thought women were bad luck, so I had to change my name to Thomas. 


    Photo by Anna Bowring

    On the top deck we learnt about punishments. Some were revolting like if you stole something you would have your hand put under the cross where Francis Drake's chaplain gave daily prayers. You would have to keep your hand there for four hours without moving. The problem was that if you stole from one person you stole from everyone, and people would elbow you and make you move. Then the ships carpenter would nail your hand below the cross. After the four hours your hand would be pulled off the nail, you would probably get a bad infection and get your hand chopped off. 

    We also found out that Francis Drake didn't have a steering wheel, he had a piece of wood which you turn left and right. We then went to Drake's cabin. It was small but he was the only person who had a bed. Downstairs we saw all the equipment used for raising the anchor, there was a long piece of metal that had holes in it. Our guide got six people to get long pieces of wood and put them in the holes, they then had go round to raise the anchor. The guide sang a tune so they could keep in time. We then went to the dinner table, where there was a portrait of Francis Drake after the voyage. It showed him with a globe. Only people who have been around the world had a globe in their portrait. 

    The next deck below was the deck where the sailors slept, it was also the deck where the cannons were. The sailors slept on the cold hard floor, poor people! One thing Drake's men were well known for was firing cannons quickly. They could fire cannons in under three minutes, other ships would take approximately 15 minutes to fire their cannons. Drake had small minion cannons, so the ship would be lighter and less likely to sink. The roof was very low because it would help the ship not sink. 


    Photo by Anna Bowring

    The last deck had no natural light because it was below water level. It was used for storing gold, silver and food. Apparently reports say that by the end of the voyage the deck was covered with gold, silver and spices and you would have to walk over them. 

    After the trip a few people told me that `I was amazed to find out about the punishments,`it was an amazing trip, the facts were so interesting. ` 

    Thank you to every one who organised the trip.


    Photo by Anna Bowring

     
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    Resting Place

    Victoria Nielson - Saturday, February 15, 2014


    Resting Place - a project supported by the Arts Council England and Kent County Council


    Resting Place is a series of individual live performances taking place sporadically over two years in response to events written in the diary of First World War VAD nurse, Clarice Spratling, and the journey she made.


    Clarice Spratling was a young woman of 24 when she decided, along with two friends, to assist the British war effort. The three women became Voluntary Aid Detachment nurses and headed to France in September 1915. Clarice began writing a diary, initially full of expectation and excitement as she prepared to leave her Ramsgate home. The record of her journey soon darkened as she became witness to the horrors unfolding on the Western Front.


    Source: Resting Place

    Discovering Clarice’s diary in her parent's attic, artist Dawn Cole was fascinated to learn she had a great aunt who took a fit of fancy and headed to France. Winner of the V&A prize at the international print biennale 2011, and shortlisted for 2013 Arts Foundation Award, Cole has been developing the ‘Resting Place’ project since the beginning of 2012. Using pillowcases as a representation of the suffering of Clarice’s charges, this live performance project draws in the viewer to consider aspects of the war more often left untold; from the viewpoint of a young woman on the frontline. 


    Source: Resting Place

    With funding from Arts Council England and Kent County Council, a series of live performances of contemporary dance and spoken word will accompany the laying of the pillowcases in public spaces. The imagery will mirror the war graves of the Wimereux cemetery in France, near to where Clarice was posted, and where some of the men she nursed are buried.

    The first series of Resting Place performances will begin in spring 2014.  Starting in Ellington Park, opposite Clarice's home in the Kent coastal town of Ramsgate, each one off performance will take its inspiration from the pages of Clarice's diary and the journey she made.

    Ellington Park, Ramsgate, Kent Sunday, 23 March 2014

    Charing Cross Station, London Saturday, 10 May 2014

    Seafront, Folkestone, Kent Sunday, 29 September 2014

    Wimereux, France Spring 2015

    Schools In East Kent

    What would you say to a young woman leaving to go to war?

    Would you like to be involved in this wonderful project?  If so, please send your messages in the form of a bunting flag that will be used to make strings of bunting to adorn Ellington Park.

    You can take part in a number of ways

    (1) A template can be downloaded from the ‘Bunting’ page on the Resting Place website, printed and used for your message. This can then be either posted to Dawn Cole, c/o Platform-7 Events, The Little House, 16a Belmont Hill, SE13 5BD or scanned and emailed to dawn.m.cole@btinternet.com
    (2) A blank paper bunting flag can be posted to you – just email dawn.m.cole@btinternet.com to request.
    (3) Bunting flags can be paper or fabric, drawn, decorated, knitted or embroidered
    (4) Schools/groups/organisations can request a pack of blank flags

    All messages must now be received by 15th March 2014

    All contributors will receive an invitation to attend the first Resting Place event.

    Any questions please email dawn.m.cole@btinternet.com

    For further information about Resting Place please see the website www.restingplace.eu

    Resting Place is supported by Arts Council England and Kent County Council


     
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    Creating artistic impressions of lives lost

    Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, January 15, 2014


    One moving way of remembering those that lost their lives during both World Wars is the creation of artistic impressions. 


    The Reggio Emilia philosophy suggests that 


    (1) Children must have some control over the direction of their learning;
    (2) Children must be able to learn through experiences of touching, moving, listening, seeing, and hearing;
    (3) Children have a relationship with other children and with material items in the world that children must be allowed to explore and
    (4) Children must have endless ways and opportunities to express themselves.


    Arts experiences and creative drama activities in particular, can help children to develop an enhanced understanding of their own perceptions, emotions and viewpoints of this commemorative time. Creating artistic impressions of World War One or World War II can give them "opportunities to explore, observe, hypothesize, question and discuss to clarify their understanding"


    Below are some examples of artistic impressions that so beautifully provide a visual impact on our senses.


    ***


    Two british artists led a project to mark International Peace Day in 2013 that covered the famous Normandy coastline in poignant silhouettes. A team of 500 artists and volunteers helped contribute to this moving "fallen" impressions in the sand that were left to be washed away by the tide at the end of the day. 



    It was a very visual and haunting reminder of lives lost in war. 


    For more information on this remarkable venture, please read this Daily Mail article


    ***


    Students at Wellington College, Crowthorne, Berkshire put on a profound display prior to Remembrance Day 2012 to honour former 707 alumni who had died in the trenches between 1914 - 1918.  These included Rudyard Kipling's son Jack. Kipling's son John died in the First World War, at the Battle of Loos in September 1915, at age 18. John's death has been linked to Kipling's 1916 poem "My Boy Jack"


    “Have you news of my boy Jack?”
    Not this tide.
    “When d’you think that he’ll come back?”
    Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

    “Has any one else had word of him?”
    Not this tide.
    For what is sunk will hardly swim,
    Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

    “Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?”
    None this tide,
    Nor any tide,
    Except he did not shame his kind —
    Not even with that wind blowing, and that tide.

    Then hold your head up all the more,
    This tide,
    And every tide;
    Because he was the son you bore,
    And gave to that wind blowing and that tide!"



    Wellington's Master Dr Anthony Seldon said: 'One is always trying to find ways of making the extent of the sacrifice meaningful to young people.


    A book, 'Public Schools and the Great War’ by Anthony Seldon, Master of Wellington College and David Walsh (Pen & Sword Books, RRP £25) is available from Telegraph Books at £23 + £1.35p&p. Call 0844 871 1514 or visit books.telegraph.co.uk. 


    Anthony Seldon said to Hungry for History: "Most books about the Great War concentrate on the actions of adults. This book turns the focus onto schools, specifically the public or independent schools, which provided the vast majority of the officers, particularly in the first two or three years of the war, until many of them were killed off. The question the book tries to answer is how, and how well, did the schools prepare these young people? It poses the question of how young people today would be able to cope if they were suddenly asked to go abroad and fight in a barbarous war."


    ***


    The UK Children's Fine Art Exhibition (UKCFAE), supported by the Department for Education


    The Theme for the 2014 UKCFAE is Great War 100

    As part of the commemorations of the Great War 1914 - 1918, The Barnett Stross Foundation is working in partnership with Theartbay Gallery in delivering "Great War 100", a free international art project for children aged 4 - 18. Great War 100 presents young people round the world with an opportunity to express their views about the First World War in paintings, photography and sculpture. For more information, please click here



    Source: UKCFAE


    Animals in War


    Back in 1910, 650 officers and enlisted men of a Cavalry unit created this human representation of a horse head. How poignant that 8 years later, of the million horses that went to war with from England, only 65,000 came back. Such was the use of horses on the Western Front, that over 8 million died on all sides fighting in the war. Two and a half million horses were treated in veterinary hospitals with about two million being sufficiently cured that they could return to duty. 




    They, along with many other animals, were the unsung heroes of the Great War, and 100 years on their sacrifices are finally being recognised.


    Source: The Daily Mail: Few pictures show the suffering horses went through during the war.

    The Daily Mail has written a very moving article on the suffering of the 'War Horse". 
    Forgotten Heroes: A million horses were sent to fight in the Great War - only 62,000 came back

    One story that is very touching is that of Sir Astley Cooper, a 19th-century surgeon back in The Battle of Waterloo. 

    Sir Astley Cooper and Napoleon’s horses

    After the Battle of Waterloo, all the wounded horses of [the Emperor Naploleon’s] Household Brigade of cavalry were sold by auction. Sir Astley Cooper attended the sale and bought twelve which he considered so severely hurt as to require the greatest care and attention in order to effect a cure. Having had them conveyed, under the care of six grooms, to his park in the country, the great surgeon followed, and with the assistance of his servants, commenced extracting bullets and grapeshot from the bodies and limbs of the suffering animals. In a very short time after the operations had been performed, Sir Astley let them run loose in the park; and one morning, to his great delight, he saw the noble animals form in line, charge and then retreat, and afterwards gallop about, appearing greatly contented with the lot that had befallen them. These manoeuvres were repeated generally every morning, to his great satisfaction and amusement.

    [from The Oxford Book of Military Anecdotes]




     
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    Local and Community History Month May 2014

    Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, January 15, 2014


    Local and Community History Month 1 - 31 May 2014

    The aim of the month is to increase awareness of local history, promote history in general to the local community and encourage all members of the community to participate. 

    Activities happen across the UK and include trips, library exhibitions and local lectures. It is a great way for groups to highlight local history and for local people to get involved. It is a real chance for school children to learn about their local history and take pride in it, perhaps with a focus on the First World War this year.


    Children researching their school's archives for the First World War in Broadstairs, Kent

    Each year the event goes from strength to strength, and a searchable database has been created where organisations can register their events. To register for free access to the Historical Association website and add your Local events click here.

    If you wish to take part we can help by including your information on our events database. We also have a free poster template, which you can download from the site to use to publicise your event.

    More information will be available online and in The Historian. For further details contact simon.brown@history.org.uk


    In addition, TES will be providing learning resources for this event.

    The Historical Association

    The Historical Association provides solutions to history teachers and departments, in both secondary and primary schools, to help them meet their training and development needs.

    Trusted by schools and individuals alike the HA provides a history specific approach to training and development.The Historical Association provides solutions to history teachers and departments, in both secondary and primary schools, to help them meet their training and development needs.

    With membership of the HA you gain access to the journal of your choice, support online through our resources and opportunities to gain face to face advice at from experts at events and forum

     
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    'The Army Children of the First World War' project

    Victoria Nielson - Thursday, January 09, 2014



    Hungry for History encourages schools to learn more about 'The Army Children of the First World War' project which is both a very useful teaching aid for schools and a rich source of material for class discussion


    Source: TACA 


    The following information is an extract taken from The Army Children Archive (TACA)


    ‘The Army Children of the First World War’ project has been established by The Army Children Archive (TACA) as part of the First World War Centenary Partnership, led by IWM (Imperial War Museums). The First World War Centenary Partnership is delivering a global programme of events and activities inspiring young and old to connect with the lives, stories and impact of the First World War.

    During the First World War, an enormous number of British children became ‘temporary’ army children when their civilian fathers joined the British Army as volunteers or conscripts. A significant proportion of British families today will count such children among their ancestors, but may not appreciate fully how having a soldier–father affected the lives – psychologically, as well as practically – of their antecedents. Having a father who is a peacetime soldier colours a childhood, as many an army child would confirm. So having a soldier–father when one’s childhood coincides with a world war and a period of national crisis cannot fail to have an impact, from the daily sadness of missing an absent parent through the euphoric joy of reunion, however fleeting, to the trauma inflicted by a father’s injury or death.

    TACA collects, preserves and shares online information about the history of British army children and the challenges and peculiarities of growing up as the child of a regular soldier in the British Army, from the seventeenth century to today. Because the wartime experiences of the children of volunteer and conscript soldiers essentially mirrored those of the children of regular soldiers from 1914 to 1918, TACA is in a unique position to provide a deeper understanding of what they went through. Drawing on the wealth of material that it has gathered, TACA additionally encourages consideration of the many ways in which the war affected these young non-combatants.

    TACA highlights the plight of the army children of the First World War primarily visually, using two online galleries of images accessed via Flickr, as follows. 
    consists of a set of photographic portraits of army children and their families photographed between 1914 and 1918. Ten images have initially been posted, after which further images will be added weekly. Any known information about the faces and families pictured, or any clues offered by the photographs themselves, accompany the images. Viewers are invited to fill any information gaps and, if possible, to identify these forgotten faces.


    Source: TACA 
    displays a selection of First World War-era sentimental postcards and ephemera featuring army children, and children generally. Many of these images were intended to tug at the heartstrings; others, to arouse patriotic feelings; another category reflects, through the prism of childhood, national preoccupations during the Great War. The initial ten images will similarly be augmented weekly.


    Source: TACA

    A link to TACA from the Flickr sets will enable people to learn more about the lifestyles of the children of regular soldiers in more depth should they wish to do so.

    Regular updates on the progress of the project will be posted on the ‘TACA drum’ blog.


    Aims

    ‘The Army Children of the First World War’ project aims to:

    * create an instantly accessible entry point for people of all ages and nationalities to learn more about how the hostilities affected the children of fighting men;

    * visually document an important facet of the First World War as viewed from the social-history perspective, one that highlights the human cost to those on the home front, thereby deepening and enriching the nation’s store of historical knowledge;

    * serve as a useful teaching aid for schools; looking at the faces within the Flickr sets is likely, for example, to prompt twenty-first-century youngsters to identify with their counterparts of a century earlier, thereby potentially firing their interest and encouraging them to embark on independent study, be it of their own family history or of the wider historical picture; the ‘The Army Children of the First World War: a Sentimental View’ set will, in addition, provide a rich source of material for class discussion;

    * encourage the identification of previously ‘forgotten faces’, as a result of which interesting individual stories may come to light;

    * preserve and share historical images that might otherwise have been lost; and
    complement TACA’s existing work, thereby adding considerably to the range and depth of information being gathered by this unique archive.

    Diane Lees, Director-General of IWM, says, ‘We are all connected to the First World War, either through our own family history, the heritage of our local communities, or because of its long-term impact on society and the world we live in today. TACA, through its “The Army Children of the First World War” project, is enabling people to understand the impact of the Great War on society today.’

    Quick links

    • ‘The Army Children of the First World War: Faces and Families’: http://bit.ly/ACFWWFaces
    • ‘The Army Children of the First World War: a Sentimental View’: http://bit.ly/ACFWWSentimental
    • The Army Children Archive (TACA): http://www.archhistory.co.uk
    • The ‘TACA drum’ blog: http://www.tacadrum.blogspot.co.uk

    For more information, please e-mail Clare Gibson at claregibson@f2s.com

    About The Army Children Archive (TACA)

    The Army Children Archive (TACA) was founded as a website (www.archhistory.co.uk) in 2007 by Clare Gibson, a writer, editor, historian and herself a former army child. TACA’s purpose is to collect, preserve and share information about British army children and their history. An independent, non-profit-making venture, TACA is unique in focusing on the history of the children of regular (i.e., career) soldiers serving in the British Army, from its founding to today. As a virtual archive, it is instantly accessible to anyone, and it receives contributions and enquiries from former army children, historical researchers, family historians and those interested in the lives and times of army children. It is updated weekly and can also be found on Facebook (http://on.fb.me/TACAfacebook) and Twitter (www.twitter.com/ArmyChildren).

    About the First World War Centenary Partnership

    The years 2014–2018 mark the Centenary of the First World War, a landmark anniversary for Britain and the world. The First World War Centenary Partnership, led by IWM, is a growing network of more than 1,400 local, regional, national and international cultural and educational organisations who together will be presenting a vibrant programme of cultural events and activities, and digital platforms, which will enable millions of people across the world to discover more about life in the First World War. For more information, visit www.1914.org.
     
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    How animals served alongside us in war

    Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, January 08, 2014


    Animals and birds who supported British and Allied Forces in wars and campaigns are not forgotten:


    It's time to reread Jilly Cooper's incredible book, Animals in War, published nearly 30 years ago.


    About the Book (Extract taken from www.jillycooper.co.uk


    Pigeons carrying vital messages to and from the beleaguered city during the Siege of Paris; horses and mules struggling through miles of fetid mud to bring ammunition to the front in the Great War; dogs sniffing out mines for the British invasion force in the Second World War – countless brave animals have played their part in the long, cruel history of war. Some have won medals for gallantry - like G.I. Joe, the American pigeon who saved 100 British lives in Italy, and Rob, the black and white mongrel who made over twenty parachute jumps with the SAS. Too many others have died abandoned, in agony and alone, after serving their country with distinction.


    Jilly Cooper has here written a tribute to the role of animals in wartime. It is a tragic and horrifying story - yet it has its lighter moments too: a hilarious game of musical chairs played on camels during the Desert Campaign; and the budgie who remarked, when carried from a bombed-out East End tenement, ‘This is my night out’. This is a vivid and unforgettable record of man’s inhumanity to animals, but also an astonishing story of courage, intelligence, devotion and resilience.

    See more at www.jillycooper.co.uk/books/book_animals.html
    or buy at Amazon www.amazon.co.uk/Animals-War-Jilly-Cooper-OBE

    Animals in War Memorial


    Perhaps as one of your 'Hungry for History' trips, your school would be interested in paying a visit to The Animals in War Memorial at Brook Gate, Park Lane, London W1. It is a beautiful tribute to all those animals that served, suffered and died alongside our forces in in the wars and conflicts of the 20th Century. Close by you can read these words:

    "Many and various animals were employed to support British and Allied Forces in wars and campaigns over the centuries, and as a result millions died. From the pigeon to the elephant, they all played a vital role in every region of the world in the cause of human freedom.
 Their contribution must never be forgotten"

    www.animalsinwar.org.uk 


    The Camel Corps


    A veterinary centre, Barnfield House is also writing an excellent series of blogs to honour animals in war and Part 1 is the Camel Corps



    Image courtesy of Library of Congress (http://memory.loc.gov/)

    Honoured: the WW1 pigeons who earned their wings


    A new exhibition highlights the contribution made by messenger pigeons in both world wars, when they were credited with saving thousands of lives and altering the course of battles. Thousands served and died.  The Royal Pigeon Racing Association is staging an exhibition at its annual conference in Blackpool on 18 and 19 January 2014 to commemorate the role played by the creatures. It will feature highlights from its archives of 10,000 documents and photographs, revealing the extent to which the birds were used during the First and Second World Wars.  It also has a detailed history of Pigeons in War on its website. The Telegraph has also written a wonderful article highlighting the extraordinary role pigeons played in both world wars.



    Picture courtesy of the Telegraph


    Education Talks


    English Heritage is focusing on “War and the Horse” for the centenary, examining the millions of horses involved as well as their riders and carers. There will be re-enactments with real horses, talks, music and children’s activities. See english-heritage.org.uk for details and prices (entry free for members). Displays take place at the following:

    Wrest Park, Bedfordshire (April 26/27).
    Kelmarsh Hall, Northamptonshire (July 19/20).
    Scarborough Castle, Yorkshire (August 9/10).
    Dover Castle, Kent (September 20/21).


    The Blue Cross, near Burton,  is encouraging primary schools and youth groups to book one of its free War Horse education talks, based on the famous story. The talks take children through the charity’s history of caring for pets in need, focusing on how it helped horses during The Great War, and brought to life by striking images from the Blue Cross historic archive. Read more here.


    The BBC highlighted the many varied animals employed during the First World War in the following article: World War One: The circus animals that helped Britain



    Man's Best Friend


    The valuable work of dogs on the front line in World War I has also been uncovered in records. It is thought around 20,000 contributed to the war effort by carrying aid to the wounded, sending and receiving messages between the lines, sniffing out enemy soldiers on foot patrols and pulling machine guns and equipment.

    The highly-trained dogs, which were heavily relied upon by Allied troops across Europe, were donated by families or recruited from dogs’ homes across the country, including Battersea Dog's Home after they were rescued from living rough as strays.  They were deemed so important that in the early months of 1917 the War Office formed the War Dog School of Instruction in Hampshire to hone the animals’ skills.


    About a million dogs died in action. Sgt Stubby, an American Pit Bull Terrier mix was the most decorated dog of World War I and became the first dog to be given a rank (of Sergeant) when he discovered, captured, and alerted the Allies to the presence of a German spy. Rags was another notable World War I dog.


    There is a wonderful outline of Dogs in War in Wikipedia. In addition, please see the following links:



    Source: Wikipedia


    But let's not also forget those animals that sadly died at home - over 750,000 were put down by the end of the first week of World War II. However, amazing organisations such as Battersea Dog's Home performed incredible feats. 145,000 dogs were cared for by just 4 staff during the war - please doff your caps to them! 


    Read more at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24478532


    The BBC World War One Programme has a great section on teachers' notes and classroom ideas looking at animals during the war. Please click here for more information

     
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    Visiting Battlefields, Memorials and War Graves both home and abroad

    Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, January 07, 2014



    School visits to the First World War Battlefields, Memorials and War Graves: 


    Schooltrips are often the memory children take with them into adulthood and there are many learning resources available both home and abroad.


    http://www.hungryforhistory.info/battlefields.png


    Battlefield Visits

    According to the the Government, more than 1,000 schools have already signed up to visit the First World War battlefields under the centenary scheme set up to commemorate the Great War.  Make sure your school signs up too. The tours start in the Spring of 2014 and will run until 2019. Each maintained secondary school can send at least 2 pupils and a teacher on a four day tour, which is run by the Institute of Education and the School Travel Group. Perhaps it is a chance to link with other schools in your area and take part in such remembrance ceremonies together?


    For more information and to sign up, please visit

    http://www.ioe.ac.uk/research/87073.html

    http://www.stg-travel-group.co.uk/component/k2/item/100-battlefields-tour-project

    https://www.gov.uk/government/topical-events/first-world-war-centenary

     

    Professor Stuart Foster, Executive Director, The First World War Centenary Battlefield Tours Programme, said: "Our aim is to develop an innovative and engaging First World War education programme for all schools in England with visits to the battlefield sites at the centre. The programme is founded on 2 key ideas. First, that schools and pupils actively engage in genuine historical enquiries about different aspects of the war. Second, that pupils develop a deeper understanding and personal connection to those affected by the war. For example, during the first pilot tour background research enabled us to find the grave of one pupil’s great, great uncle and the whole tour group held a remembrance ceremony at the graveside. It was a truly unforgettable moment and an example of the kind of experience that we hope to replicate time and again during the next 5 years."

    There are some wonderful apps now out there to help support your trip. Look at:


    This app is called 'Great War Battlefields of the Western Front’, and lists 170 locations of interest with 700 photographs, masses of information, maps etc.

    This app features an interactive timeline that revolutionizes the way that history can be viewed and understood. Over 100 films from international news archives, additional commentary by Dan Snow, over 500 still images and 1000 written entries give the viewer an insight into the events of WW1 in a way never before possible.


    Learning Opportunities Back Home

    The children from each school who do not visit can also benefit from hearing about the experiences of those pupils and teachers that will travel to the Western Front. Working together as a group of students of all ages, children could set up First World War commemoration projects and activities that could link in the local area and other schools. Using their natural curiosity, through discussion and collaboration, and sharing of the ideas and results, children will be able to learn about both their local community's First World War history, their local heroes and also potentially their family's First World War history.


    Schools in Cumbria are already leading the way in discovering more about the names on local war memorials. Read more




    The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lesson activities encourages pupils, using the their casualty database, to find the local casualties themselves  Attached is a link.  These results could also contribute to the IWM's First World War Centenary programme. They have launched Lives of the First World War, which aims to bring material from museums, libraries, archives, schools and family collections from across the world together in one place, helping to reveal 8 million stories.  They are looking for our help to start telling stories of those who served in uniform and worked on the home front. How inspirational for the young generation of today to help explore and capture these memories and stories and leave their own legacy to future generations. 


    Lives of the First World War can be explored by anyone of any age, so it will always be relevant to schools and children. You must be at least 12 in order to create an account and add to life stories, and it is expected that many second level students will take an active part in creating the permanent digital memorial.

    Lives of the First World War are also planning a specific programme for schools, and details of this will be available later in 2014.


     

    http://www.hungryforhistory.info/Local%20history%20photos.png

     


    Memorials in the United Kingdom

    Living Memorials
    In addition, there are several living memorial 'battlefields' being set up back at home which will allow many more children to visit and experience the day-to-day life of soldiers during the 1914-1918 conflict.

    In Cambridgeshire, a planning application has been submitted to build the National Centre for the Great War in Dry Drayton. Read more at: http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk


    In Wales, The Back to the Front Experience has been created at Morfa Bay Adventure in Pendine, Carmarthenshire. Read more at: http://www.walesonline.co.uk and BBC News

    RAF Halton: A small section of a practice trench system has now been fully restored. Read more at: http://www.raf.mod.uk


    Staffordshire Regiment Museum: A new trench offers authentic World War One experience in Whittington. Read more at: http://staffordshireregimentmuseum.com


    A barn at Ivy Farm, in East Mersea, has been transformed into a First World War mess . Read more at the Daily Gazette

    Bodelwyddan Castle in Denbighshire has practice trenches in its parkland, used by new recruits at nearby Kinmel Park Camp. You can stroll the trenches, which have interpretation boards


    Haileybury College is marking the centenary by building a partial replica of an elaborate trench system originally dug in 1914/1915 by its pupils. The school will be opening it to visiting school groups. It will be advised by the military historian, Andrew Robertshaw.  Read more here at at The Sunday Times

    If you know of any other living memorials here in the UK, please do share with us so that many other schools can benefit from such a visit.


    Commonwealth War Graves Commission

    This wonderful organisation ensures that 1.7 million people who died in the two world wars will never be forgotten. They care for cemeteries and memorials at 23,000 locations, in 153 countries. The CWGC has recently launched its extensive educational resources, which are free for all schools to utilize and will be making a further announcement early in 2014 regarding its educational programmes. 


    Times Educational Supplement for both the primary and the secondary classrooms

    TES has written two excellent blogs on The First World War in the classroom - showing the many varied learning resources available through TES and their partners

    The First World War in the Primary Classroom

    The First World War in the Secondary Classroom





     
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    ITV Anglia Schools Report Challenge for the Centenary

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, January 06, 2014



    The following extract is taken from ITV News Anglia on a fantastic regional schools project they have launched:



    As the country gets ready to mark 100 years since the outbreak of hostilities in the summer of 1914, ITV News Anglia is challenging the region’s schoolchildren to share their communities’ stories.

    We are looking for a range of story ideas from across the ITV News Anglia region that:


    Will make engaging and relevant television news reports

    Show originality. A fresh and original idea and treatment for the story.

    Feature strong interviewees

    Include artefacts that have been found for inclusion in the report (Photos/artwork/books/historical manuscripts)

    Show the school and its children fully understand the sacrifices made by people, towns and villages in their vicinity

    Schools must do their own research, write their scripts (with the help of an ITV News Anglia producer), set up their own interviews, and arrange filming locations.

    For a chance to have your 'First World War Centenary - School Report' on ITV News Anglia, here is what you need to do

    Discuss the idea at school and identify your story with a teacher.

    Get your teacher to email us at ww1anglia@itv.com with your idea including the following:

    The name of your school

    The contact details including email, telephone number and the name of the teacher in charge of the project.

    Your story idea in no more than 250 words. We need to know not just the background to the story but the elements you would include in it for filming, as well as a brief idea of how you would tell it. Don’t worry – we don’t expect you to know the technicalities of filming, just your ideas. If you are selected we will help you with the next steps.

    The closing date for the ideas is midday on Monday 3 February 2014.


    Please read more at ITV.com


     
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    History Mnemonics - What are your favourites?

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, January 03, 2014



    Hungry for History would like to create a collection of the best history mnemonics that have been taught for many years as a tool for schoolchildren of today. But what is a mnemonic?

    A mnemonic is any learning technique that aids information retention. Mnemonics aim to translate information into a form that the human brain can retain better than its original form.  "Memory Needs Every Method Of Nurturing Its Capacity" is a mnemonic for how to spell mnemonic. See more at Wikipedia


    Detail of Giordano Bruno's statue in Rome. Bruno was famous for his mnemonics, some of which he included in his treatises De umbris idearum and Ars Memoriae. Source: Wikipedia


    Here are a few of our favourites for history:

    1. "NO PLAN LIKE YOURS TO STUDY HISTORY WISELY"
    This denotes the sequence of Royal dynasties: Norman, Plantagenet, Lancastrian, York, Tudor, Stuart, Hanover, Windsor.

    2. "Willie, Willie, Harry, Ste, Harry, Dick, John, Harry III; 1,2,3 Neds, Richard II, Henry 4,5,6, then who?"
    This is the sequence of Kings of England from 1066 to death of Henry VI.

    3. "In fourteen hundred and ninety two, Columbus sailed the Ocean blue."
    An easy way to remember the date of Columbus discovering America.

    4. "1760 yards in a mile, declared George III with a smile."
    This shows the number of yards in a mile, as well as the date of accession to the throne of George III.

    5. "Charles the First walked and talked half an hour after his head was cut off"
    Charles I was beheaded in 1649 and the above sentence only makes sense with proper punctuation as follows: "Charles the First walked and talked; half an hour after, his head was cut off"!

    Can you add to these?  Please let us know via our Contacts page
     
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    The Remembrance Image Project

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, January 03, 2014


    The Remembrance Image Project 

    The Remembrance Image Project is a photography project which has been set up as part of the centenary commemorations for the First World War.



    The aims of the project are:

    * to photograph a selection of WW1 sites at or close to their 100th anniversary. Such sites may be battlefields or memorials, or locations back in the UK with a WW1 connection. The aim is to create images which are not just a record of a site at its centenary, but which capture something of the emotion or spirit of the location.

    * to share these images with others, with a particular focus on schools, through exhibitions, interactive workshops, talks and other media; and in so doing to promote awareness and debate about the war and about the role of remembrance.

    * to encourage others to create their own photographic images of remembrance, and to share these with the project as a means of opening up and spreading the discussion about the centenary.

    The project is being run by Simon Gregor, a freelance photographer who lives in Lambeth, south London. The project currently has no external funding support, but is being self-financed. The aim is currently to make 8-10 trips to battlefield sites abroad during the 2014-18 period; as well as visiting a selection of sites within the UK. 



    Collaborations and partnerships
    The overarching ambition of the project is to use photos taken today as a way of helping people to engage with the history of WW1, and to reflect on the role of remembrance. The project is therefore very keen to partner with others in making that happen. Already, emerging partnerships are in place with the RAF Museum, the Battlefields Trust and Lambeth Council. Discussions are ongoing with other groups, and a programme of speaking/workshop engagements is developing with groups as diverse as school groups, Women’s Institute, libraries and camera clubs.

    If your school would be interested in the possibility of engaging with the project, then possible ideas include:

    * provision of talks, seminars or interactive workshops for your school, tailored to your desired outcomes/learning needs
    * mounting an exhibition of project images in your school
    * developing a tailored image library to serve your own needs
    * running an ongoing project with your school to create their own images of remembrance 
    * collaborating on school publications, for example if you need images for illustrative purposes, or to accompany your own school's exhibition for the centenary
    * developing battlefield school visits/tours with a creative photographic dimension

    For the talks, workshops and other outreach parts of the project, schools receiving a presentation are asked to cover the costs (usually just travel); and to make a contribution of whatever they can afford towards the costs of running the project.



    Hungry for History is very much in support of The Remembrance Image Project and believes it is a great learning tool for those schoolchildren visiting the battlefields and memorials and also for First World War projects in the classroom. If your school is interested, perhaps you could link up with other local schools in your area and participate in the project together?


    For more information or to arrange a visit from the Remembrance Image Project, please contact Simon Gregor at www.riproject.wordpress.com Facebook: Remembrance Image Project Twitter:@rememberip
     
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    A National Schools History Competition

    Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, November 26, 2013


    100 Defining Moments in European History
    A National Timeline Competition for Schools

    One initial focus for ‘Hungry for History’ will be the launch in early 2014 of a national timeline competition in partnership with What on Earth Publishing and Waterloo 200



    The Battle of Waterloo - A Defining Moment in European History


    We will will seek to challenge children from across the UK to help determine 100 Defining Moments in European history of the last 200 years from 1815 – 2015.

    A distinguished judging panel will decide which ‘100 Moments’ will be included in an official commemorative timeline which will be launched in 2015 in conjunction with the bi-centenary anniversary of ‘The Battle of Waterloo’ currently being organised by Waterloo 200. Each of the ‘100 Moments’ will be published every day over the commemorative period of Napoleon’s 100 days (from March to June 2015) culminating in the ‘The Battle of Waterloo’ National Commemorations in June 2015.


    More details on the competition and information on how to take part will be available in early 2014.




    Christopher Lloyd


    Christopher Lloyd, founder of What on Earth Publishing said: “We want to challenge the children across the United Kingdom to find out for themselves what they believe are our defining moments in our history and become an expert wherever their curiosity leads them. Through discussion and collaboration, it will develop a series of skill sets and allow them to leave their own lasting legacy.”



    More to follow on this shortly....
     
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    Journey's End

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, November 25, 2013


    JOURNEY’S END BY R.C. SHERRIFF


    A Performance by Uppingham School, one of Hungry for History's Lead Ambassadors


    6 - 8 February 2014

    Journey’s End is a realistic portrayal of life in a front-line trench in the First World War. It is set in March 1918 as the Germans were preparing an all-out attack on the Allies. Written by R.C. Sherriff (a veteran of the Western Front) in 1928 to celebrate ten years since the signing of the Armistice, it was soon translated into every European language and performed all over the world. The play features themes such as innocence, sacrifice, comradeship, bravery and combat fatigue. Complex relationships and conflict between the characters are at the heart of the play, such as the heroic yet flawed Captain Stanhope who is worshipped by the straight-from-school Second Lieutenant Raleigh. There is a sense of claustrophobia and imminent catastrophe, yet the play has plenty of humour and as the soldiers wait to ‘go over the top’, they manage to laugh, joke and bond together. Journey’s End is as relevant now as it was then: accessible to all, the play is so moving because Sherriff deals with the horrors of war with honesty, understanding and compassion.

    The play is set in a First World War trench, and the studio theatre will be transformed into a Western Front experience for the audience. Thirty-four old boys from Fircroft* fell in the First World War, and their stories, researched by new generations of Fircroftians, will be displayed in the theatre.

    The play was written at a time of acute class-consciousness in Britain, when the officers were drawn almost exclusively from the playing-fields of the most exclusive schools. 434 Old Uppinghamians lost their lives in the First World War, and thirty-four of these were from Fircroft. This play is being put on by the current boys of Fircroft, who dedicate the play to their memory. “We will remember them."



    *Fircroft is a boys boarding house at Uppingham School, Rutland.




    Drawing by a current Fircroft boy for Journey's End Uppingham


    This incredible play, by its very nature, will require that those involved be put into circumstances, mentally and emotionally that are outside their understanding of how things should be.  It will really help them and others grasp the sacrifice of others.  


    Plays are great vehicles for the imagination and gives those involved a chance to present their emotions visually. Here is a wonderful example of just that. Consider your school, or a group of local schools perhaps getting involved in something similar. 


    Journey's End will be open to public viewing from 6 - 8 February 2014 and if your school would be interested in seeing this, please contact us

     
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    The World Remembers

    Victoria Nielson - Sunday, November 24, 2013


    A Centenary British First World War Vigil for Schools Displaying The Names of the Fallen:

    The World Remembers will acknowledge each of the First World War dead by name. 

    From 2014 to 2018, the names of the British WWI dead, along with those of all other participating nations, will be viewed in selected schools, on personal communication devices, by means of the Internet. Each of the names will be programmed to appear at an exact year, month, night, hour and minute. This will allow anyone in the United Kingdom and around the world to find the year, day, hour and minute on the Vigil website that any particular name will appear.



    The Vigil of the names could reach millions of students and families in the UK and other countries. The Vigil will encourage students and individuals to explore their WWI family history, their nation’s history and international history.

    One of Hungry for History's Lead Ambassador Schools, Wellington College, with its strong military history, has been asked to join this Centenary Vigil and take a lead role as the Presenting Partner for the Vigil in selected schools in the United Kingdom.

    Robert Thomson, The World Remembers said "By displaying the names of each man and woman killed in WWI in the United Kingdom and around the world, we will not only remember - we will also educate. We will honour shared histories. The 1914-1918 war cast a shadow that extended for generations. Together, we can create a unique Centenary project in schools and other venues around the world. Memory is part of what makes us human."

    More details on this outstanding project including details on how the names will be displayed and presented in schools and the potential for curriculum and project work in the classroom will be available soon.  Please also visit: http://theworldremembers.ca





     
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    Fields of Battle Lands of Peace 1914 - 1918

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, November 22, 2013





    Fields of Battle 14-18 has developed a unique and engaging touring street gallery exhibition, based not on the horrors of the First World War, but on how over time, nature has healed the battlefields, creating a link between the modern day and the personal dramas and stories these peaceful landscapes now hide. 

    The Gallery Tour

    The gallery tour has been created to appeal to all ages. Each 60 large-scale (1.8 x 1.2 metre) powerful image is shown alongside fascinating historical information and educational content. A giant walk on map of the world and the Western Front together with a mobile educational centre complete this unique exhibition which will tour Britain and Eire between August 2014 and Armistice Day in November 2018.


    The Walk-On Map

    Adopting an inclusive approach to helping as many people as possible to commemorate, to be involved and to learn about the First World War, the exhibition will be sited in open spaces such as landmark locations, civic squares, memorial sites and busy pedestrianised city centre areas, allowing free access 24 hours a day in all weathers.  

    Numerous cities and towns across the United Kingdom have already expressed firm interest in hosting the exhibition during the Centenary period including:

    London
    Nottingham
    Leeds
    Norwich
    Henley on Thames
    Birmingham
    Edinburgh
    Belfast
    Portsmouth
    Brighton
    Southampton
    Perth
    Cardiff

    Requests to host the street gallery are being driven by cities wishing to align the exhibition's presence with battles and events of major relevance and importance to their particular region, thus creating a strong emotional connection with the content. For example, Leeds has requested the exhibition to be on display from early July 2016.  This will coincide with the terrible losses suffered by the Leeds Pals on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. 

    In order to further enhance local commemoration, each tour host will be offered the option of including up to ten main images and supporting caption panels focusing on events at a local level. This will inspire these communities to share their own untold stories and unique family histories. 

    Education

    The gallery tour will provide access to engaging educational material in the form of downloadable PDFs, web content and education packs via regularly updated QR codes and dedicated URLs.  These will be tailored specifically to British Primary and Secondary curriculums. 

    Fields of Battle-Lands of Peace 14-18 is a partner in the First World War Centenary programme led by the Imperial War Museum.  For more information on the tour or to find out how you can request for your local area to be involved, please visit http://www.fieldsofbattle1418.org/




     
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    In the Footsteps of Giants

    Victoria Nielson - Thursday, November 21, 2013


    In the Footsteps of Giants: Harrovian VCs, 1914-18

    From 17 January until 25 March 2014 the Old Speech Room Gallery (OSRG) at Harrow School is focusing on the stories of seven Old Harrovians who gained the Victoria Cross during the First World War.



    The School’s collections and archival records have been brought together to portray the seven individuals from their earliest days at Harrow. The stories of their campaigns and battles leading to the VC award are told and their original regimental flags will be displayed. The flags are fragile but have been most carefully looked after by the school and their inclusion provides a poignant connection to the events of a century ago.

    A current pupil is the great-nephew of one of the VC holders in question and he is playing a key role in the development of this exhibition.

    If you would like to view this Gallery from January 2014 or receive further information either contact us or:


    osrgcurator@harrowschool.org.uk
    02088728205
    Old Speech Room Gallery, Harrow-on-the-Hill, Middlesex HA1 3HP



    Old Speech Room Gallery and Museum

    The Old Speech Room was built in 1819-21 as a chamber in which to encourage public speaking. It was converted into a gallery by Alan Irvine in 1976 as a repository for the School's distinguished collection of antiquities and fine art. The Gallery runs the Old Speech Room Gallery Arts Society, through which boys help to research, design and curate exhibitions.

    THE COLLECTIONS
    The collections comprise Egyptian, Greek and Etruscan antiquities, English watercolours, Modern British paintings, Japanese prints, photographs, sculpture, manuscripts, rare Bibles, printed books, coins, stamps and natural history. There is also a set of Stuart Devlin’s parcel gilt Easter eggs. Designed in the tradition of Fabergé, each egg contains a surprise when opened, such as a jester, a fish in seaweed or a mouse in a wedge of cheese.

    Sir Winston Churchill’s A Distant View of Venice, 1929 is one of the highlights of the collection. It is an excellent example of his robust and energetic style. Churchill is above all a colourist. He captured the essence of the Venetian colour in the city, the clouds and their reflections in the water. The bravura brushwork gives texture to the surface of the canvas, from the impasto in the sky to the long, fluid strokes in the water. His enthusiasm was inexhaustible. In his essay Painting as a Pastime, he wrote: "When I get to heaven I mean to spend a considerable portion of my first million years in painting, and so get to the bottom of the subject."

    Not all of the collections can be displayed at the same time but the following items are usually on show: Greek and Egyptian antiquities, paintings by Romney, Sir Winston Churchill, David Jones and Dan Llywelyn Hall and portrait busts of Old Harrovians such as Byron and Sheridan.

    RECENT EXHIBITIONS
    Recent exhibitions from the collections include Defining Mementoes: An exploration of the nature of mementoes and the reasons we treasure them (2012); Cecil Beaton's Portrait Photographs (2012); Revealing Byron (2012); The Hill Then and Now (2012); Aspects of Albion (2013); About Turn: The best of the BAMS collection (2013); Second Definition (2013).

    RECENT ACQUISITIONS
    Fourteen 18-19th century prints of Harrow-on-the-Hill, acquired from Mrs Judith Cleveland, July 2012.
    Collection of fossils and Neolithic stone tools, presented by Mr Trevor Grey, September 2012.
    Two signed portrait photographs of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and His Royal Highness Prince Philip, presented by Mr Peter Hunter, May 2013.

    THE OLD SPEECH ROOM GALLERY APP
    The OSRG App is now available to Gallery visitors and is free to download. It introduces sixteen items from the permanent displays as well as featuring some of the treasures that are not usually on exhibition.

    - See more at: Harrow School The Old Speech Room Gallery
     
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    School history trips created by children for children

    Victoria Nielson - Monday, November 18, 2013



    Invasions and Embarkations History Tour for Schools
    Created by children for children

    Pupils of a Grammar School in Kent are looking to work with pupils at partner schools to discover, research and recommend a school history tour, 'Invasions and Embarkations', which focuses on the incredible historic events the Isle of Thanet has witnessed over the centuries. 


    Source: Wikipedia


    Thanet was an island when the Romans invaded Britain and built forts at Richborough and Reculver to guard each end of the Wansum Channel which separated Thanet from the rest of Kent. Towards the end of the Roman occupation the Vikings were regular raiders. In AD449 Hengist landed at Pegwell Bay taking possession of Thanet and the rest of Kent and the visitors stayed and made there homes. In AD597 Augustine landed much more peacefully and founded his Christian monastery in Canterbury. The Monks spread their faith to Thanet, building the church at Minster.

    Ramsgate was the town where the The Duke of Wellington's troops trained and embarked during the Napoleonic Wars.  It was also the town where the 700 'little ships' embarked for Dunkirk. During the First World War 1914/18 a secret "Q" port (Richborough Port) by the banks of the River Stour was the starting point of a ferry service for troops and munitions to France and Flanders. Camps were occupied by thousands of soldiers who were taken by day or by night across the North Sea and the Channel to Dunkirk and Calais.



    Richborough Port

    Source: http://www.open-sandwich.co.uk


    Learning about local history and taking pride in it


    This inspiring venture will encourage pupils to think about their local history differently and taking pride in it. They also have the opportunity to investigate several local historical sites, which allows them to put real local history into context. 


    This is a wonderful example of how pupils are helping to mastermind the 'Hungry for History' venture and it shows how this campaign can grow in the direction the children and schools wish to take it. 


    It is an activity that demonstrates the sharing of ideas, the learning of local history, the links with both World War One and World War Two Commemorations and the forging of links with other like-minded schools.  


    If your school is in an area with its own rich historical stories that you are proud of, why not think about doing something similar to encourage other schools to come and learn about your local history?


    More news will follow next year on this fantastic school project.



     
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    The Magic of History Festivals

    Victoria Nielson - Saturday, November 16, 2013


    A visit to a history festival in the UK can be a hugely rewarding experience for school children and many offer educational programmes designed to bring history alive to the younger generation.

    One of our particular favourites is the The Daily Mail Chalke Valley History Festival in Wiltshire.  For a week in June they create an extraordinary festival dedicated to history with many living history displays, a literary history focus with many fascinating and knowledgeable speakers and a schools programme which offers a series of lectures, seminars, living history and inter-active demonstrations to bring history alive, excite and inspire the young generation of today.


    Chalke Valley Poster


    We are particularly excited about their new 'History Hub' - short, digital and educational videos produced to bring to life particular eras or answer specific questions in history. These will feature established historians talking about subjects relevant to the schools' curriculum and will be freely downloadable by teachers for use in their lessons. Click here for a taster.

    Chalke History @CVHISTORYFEST

    It is truly an enjoyable celebration of history.
     
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    Talks by eminent historians

    Victoria Nielson - Saturday, November 16, 2013


    Hungry for History Lead Ambassador Schools are working towards providing a whole array of eminent speakers over the next year, to not only cover the commemorative theme but also provide interesting talks covering a whole host of history subjects. A more comprehensive list will gradually become available as speakers are confirmed but here are a few to whet your appetite.  If your school would like to send a few pupils to listen to these distinguished guest speakers, please contact us


    In addition, if you have speakers lined up next year that you would like to open up to other schools in your area to come and enjoy, please contact us so that we can share the event for you.


    Simon Sebag Montefiore


    Harrow School, 5 High St, Harrow on the Hill, Middlesex HA1 3HP


    21 January 2014

    Martin Stead
    ‘World War One: All Over by Christmas: The Benefit of Hindsight’


    23 January 2014

    Simon Sebag Montefiore 

    ‘From Harrow to Jerusalem: Adventures of a Writer in War and Peace’ 


    27 February 2014

    Colonel Ken Peacock
    ‘Aden: Last War of Empire’


    13 March 2014

    Dr John Watts of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 

    ‘Continuity and Change in English Popular Rebellion, 1381-1549’. 


    Later in 2014, Ross Beckett OBE, will be talking about the Battle of Mons, and specifically the part played in it by the Old Harrovian General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien. Then in 2015 he will also come back to Harrow to talk the Old Harrovians who served at Waterloo


    Wellesley House School, Broadstairs, Kent


    In 2014 on a date yet to be confirmed, Professor Sir Hew Strachan, will be returning to his prep school to lecture on the First World War.


    Wellington College


    Provisional date September 18th 2014
    Jean Michel Steg, author of 'Le Jour le plus meurtrier de l'histoire de France: 22 août 1914.'




     
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    History Hobbies - Creating an appetite for history

    Victoria Nielson - Saturday, November 16, 2013



    Bring in your creative skills and design models of history events that inspire you

    Sir Hew Strachan, Military Historian and Chichele Professor at Oxford tells Hungry for History that when he was at school at Wellesley House in Broadstairs, Kent, there was an extra-curricular competition called 'History Hobbies'.

    "David Henniker-Major and I submitted an entry on Waterloo, which included a three dimensional model of the battlefield, a narrative account of the battle and a large number of drawings. We won the first prize of 10 shillings - which divided between the two of us was 5 shillings each. My parents, who had loyally met all our requests for books and materials, were not very impressed by the profit returned on the outlay! But David and I are still good friends, and I am still a military historian."

    Today, such 3D designs can be handmade the old fashioned way or designed digitally. 



    Source: Topographic Models.

    3D models can be powerful tools in the classroom for promoting discovery, demonstrating concepts and motivating children to use their creativity to also develop other skill sets including searching + finding information, solution solving and presentation skills

    This could also be an opportunity to link with other local schools and extend the creative challenge so that pupils from different schools can work together to create designs in response to local commemorative events.




     
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    Schools across Scotland to work with a leading artist

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, November 15, 2013



    Schools across Scotland will be working with a leading artist to tackle issues raised by the centenary commemorations as part of the extensive National Museums Scotland programme, funded by the Scottish Government and the Heritage Lottery Fund. 



    Source: Wikipedia

    See The Scotsman article for more information on other commemorative events planned over the next four years in Scotland.
     
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    Bletchley Park Pod Casts - Listen and Learn

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, November 15, 2013



    Mavis Batey, who played a leading role as a codebreaker at Bletchley Park died on 15th November 2013, aged 92. She was the last of the break-in experts and the last of the top female codebreakers.


    Bletchley Park is the historic site of secret British codebreaking activities during WWII and it is the birthplace of modern computing. Winston Churchill described the Codebreakers as "The geese who laid the golden egg but never cackled."

    Please do listen to amazing stories told by the codebreakers, staff and volunteers, audio from events and lectures at http://audioboo.fm/channel/bletchley-park. One of our favourites is E27 of Doreen Sawyer & her story about Dog helping in French Resistance WW2.


    Mavis Batey's husband Keith, who died in 2010, was a fellow "break-in" expert

    "Mavis was something special and what she did was something special - it was just astonishing and is the end of an era." Bletchley trustee and historian Michael Smith

    For those of you lucky enough to be close enough for a visit to Bletchley Park, near Milton Keynes, Schools, colleges and other educational establishments can take part in workshops, demonstrations, tours and collection viewings at Bletchley Park that are not available to the general public. They are continuously developing their on-site education programme to support teachers and students of any age. These visits must be booked in advance as they are tailored to primary school, secondary school or adult groups and include the following activities:

    Primary schools:-

    Codes & Ciphers 
    The National Radio Centre
    Walking Tour of the Bletchley Park Site
    Handling Collection
    Home Front
    Enigma Cinema
    Toy Collection

    Secondary schools, colleges and adults:-

    For those wishing to gain an insight into the importance of mathematics and history in the codebreaking effort, the following talks and workshops are available:

    Codes & Ciphers – suitable for general audiences
    Mathematics of Enigma – most suited to students working towards higher level GCSE (or equivalent) and beyond.
    Breaking Lorenz – Enigma’s Big Brother – a specialist talk aimed at students working towards the higher end of A-Level (or equivalent)
    History - how Bletchley Park had an impact on a number of major WW2 events.

    The Bletchley Park Trust Education Team are also considering expanding their Outreach programme to include a "mathematics roadshow" which would ideally include group-based tactile problem solving activities. Please complete this quick survey to help inform the decision.


     
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    Researching School Archives for WW1 Heroes

    Victoria Nielson - Friday, November 15, 2013



    Researching the history of your school can be a valuable way to harness children's natural curiosity and promote discovery. It will also develop a wide range of skills including reading, research, interviewing and presenting. It is also a wonderful opportunity to enable children to see that they 'are part of something bigger than oneself' whilst learning about local history and taking pride in their local war heroes.


    Many existing schools during World War One lost many pupils, names of which will be shown on 'In Memoriam' Plaques such as the below. During the next four years, we want to encourage pupils from those schools to research the names of those that lost their lives from 1914 - 1918. Understanding more about a young boy's life at school, reading some of his essays or poems and learning about his skills and aspirations will really help children to understand the sacrifice of others that walked the same hallways a hundred years ago.  Hungry for History suggests that at each Remembrance Sunday over the next four years, those boys names who died in that particular year are read out with an accompanying snippet of their life. 

    We hope this project will inspire pupils to leave their own commemorative legacy for their school.

    Simon O'Malley, Headmaster of Wellesley House School, Broadstairs, Kent (a Lead Ambassador School), says: "Unearthing and digitally archiving the history of our school has been an incredible journey for us. Our archives are glimpses into the everyday activity of our school for over a hundred years. We know that we have protected our wonderful past and our records of enduring value for many more generations to enjoy."

    A combined project at Uppingham School, another Lead Ambassador School, by pupils of the History and Art Department is in process. They are creating a giant collage of 434 photographic portraits to mark the anniversary year of the Great War. Made up of current boys and girls from across the school age groups, the faces will represent the 434 Uppinghamians who fought in the Great War 1914-1918. The faces of their peers and friends will create a vivid reality for the current pupils of the service paid by previous generations of Uppinghamians.





    The Imperial War Museum has also recently announced that Lives of the First World War will be launching to the public for the first time at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2014 at London Olympia 20–22 February 2014. This will be an opportunity to use the platform and help the IWM to discover and remember the life stories of the 8 million men and women who served in uniform and worked on the home front. 

    If you do visit the show, you can take a guided tour of Lives of the First World War and get tips from their historians to help with your school's First World War research. Please click here for more information.

    IWM's Lives of the First World War is an innovative, interactive platform that will inspire people across the world to discover, build and share the life stories of those 8 million men and women.  By the end of the centenary this will build into the permanent digital memorial to more than 8 million men and women who served in uniform and worked on the home front from across Britain and the Commonwealth, saving their stories for future generations. 

    Lives of the First World War can be explored by anyone of any age, so it will always be relevant to schools and children. You must be at least 12 in order to create an account and add to life stories, and it is expected that many second level students to take an active part in creating the permanent digital memorial.

    Lives of the First World War are also planning a specific programme for schools, and details of this will be available later in 2014.

    If you do research those school pupils who lost their lives, share them with Lives of the First World War.  

    Please also read the blog on the First World War Vigil for Schools displaying the names of the fallen: The World Remembers. From 2014 to 2018, the names of the British WWI dead, along with those of all other participating nations, will be viewed in selected schools, on personal communication devices, by means of the Internet. Each of the names will be programmed to appear at an exact year, month, night, hour and minute. This will allow anyone in the United Kingdom and around the world to find the year, day, hour and minute on the Vigil website that any particular name will appear.





     
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    Take an interest in your local overlooked war graves

    Victoria Nielson - Thursday, November 14, 2013



    The Commonwealth War Graves Commission has completed a major project to map the commemoration of every 300,000 Commonwealth war dead throughout the UK. 

    Every MP in the country has been sent a list of the locations within their constituency and have been asked to talk to their local communities to help bring attention to those graves that may have been overlooked in recent years. 

    The initiative is intended to raise awareness of the war graves here in the UK, and presents a unique opportunity for schools to work with the Commission during the Centenary of the First World War.

    Hungry for History would like to encourage schools across the UK to take up this challenge and organise projects whereby they adopt their local casualties. This could be through visiting the cemeteries and completing basic maintenance (i.e. gardening or washing the headstones), researching the local heroes and creating a local history project, which could then also feed into Lives of the First World War - the ideas and learning opportunities could be endless. One of CWGC's lesson activities encourages pupils, using the their casualty database, to find the local casualties themselves  Attached is a link.


    The Commission’s Director Finance and 14-18 Centenary, Colin Kerr, explained, “The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s work overseas is well known, but here in the United Kingdom there is little awareness of the graves to be found in a staggering 13,000 locations, that commemorate over 300,000 Commonwealth dead of the two world wars. We believe that is not right and through this initiative intend to do more to help communities, and particularly younger generations, understand the significance of these graves and the sacrifices made. In so doing, it is our hope that they incorporate these places into their learning and commemorative activities and gain a fuller understanding of the war’s impact and the ongoing importance of remembrance."




    Source: Flickr R/DV/RS

    As part of the initiative, the Commission is planning a nationwide, volunteer outreach programme aimed at providing educators with a comprehensive range of resources and support materials linked to the graves and in their hometowns. This will be announced early in 2014.






     
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    A History of Ireland in 100 objects

    Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, November 13, 2013


    New history lesson plans for primary schools in Ireland have been unveiled


    The government has announced plans for new primary school history lessons that incorporate multimedia and arts-focused elements - A History of Ireland in 100 Objects.


    This is a collaborative project involving the National Museum of Ireland, the Irish Times and the Royal Irish Academy.


    Please see attached news release

    Minister for Education and Skills, Ruairí Quinn and Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Jimmy Deenihan launched the primary school lesson plans at the Central Model School in Dublin. Source: www.100objects.ie/news

    Minister for education and skills Ruairi Quinn said: "These lesson plans will help to bring history to life for our primary school children and will stimulate them to look into their own family and local history."

    The History of Ireland in 100 Objects can be studied using an interactive website, a multi-platform app and ebook, while a fully illustrated hardback book has also been published.

    The full list is available online at www.100objects.ie/education and includes curriculum links, teaching ideas and activities for primary school children. The lesson plans are supported by a wide range of audio and visual material. 
     
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    IWM's Centenary Commemorations - Learning Resources

    Victoria Nielson - Wednesday, November 13, 2013




    BRITISH RESPONSE TO THE OUTBREAK OF WAR, AUGUST 1914
    Source: IWM

    Extraordinary Learning Resources

    The first of the Imperial War Museum's new First World War online learning resources, focusing on Recruitment and Conscription, is available now. In the coming months, more resources in the series will be released from the IWM for you to use in your classroom.


    Their existing range of free resources is also available. They include teaching activities and source material from IWM Collections. These can be used on a visit to one of their branches or in the classroom.


    IWM also has a wide range of learning resources for all ages available from the Online Shop, including books and education packs.

    For more information on the IWMs see Online learning resources

    First World War Centenary Partnership

    IWM is leading the First World War Centenary Partnership, a network of over 1,600 local, regional, national and international cultural and educational organisations from 27 countries around the world.

    The Partnership, established by IWM in 2010, will present a global programme of cultural events and activities from 2014-18 to commemorate the centenary of the First World War. This collective international programme will enable millions of people to discover more about life during the First World War, connecting current and future generations with the stories and impact of this conflict.

    Find out how you can take part in this global commemoration. Browse the online centenary cultural events calendar, produced in partnership with Culture24 at 1914.org




     
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    Dan Snow's favourite historical days out

    Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, November 12, 2013


    The historian Dan Snow highlights some of his favourite places to go for a historical and enjoyable day out 


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/10429984/Dan-Snow-on-his-favourite-historical-days-out.html


    Culloden Battlefield Inverness: www.nts.org.uk/culloden


    Charlestown, Cornwall: www.visitcornwall.com


    Harlech Castle, Gwynedd: www.harlech.com


    Vindolanda, Northumberland: www.vindolanda.com


    The Tank Museum, Dorset: www.tankmuseum.org


    One of Hungry for History's favourites is The Tank Museum in Dorset. They bring the history of tanks and tank crew to life and have four incredible exhibitions available:


    The Tank Story: The best display of tanks in the world in a modern exhibition

    Battlegroup Afghanistan: Learn about the Royal Armoured Corps experiences in Afganistan

    The Discovery Centre: Their collection includes 300 tanks with almost 200 on display

    The Trench Experience: Walk in the footsteps of a World War One soldier and learn why the tank was invented



    Source: Flickr Nigel Brown


    The Tank Museum also offers excellent services for schools, colleges and individuals wishing to learn more about history, warfare, Royal Armoured Corps regiments and armoured vehicles.  Click here to learn more


    As part of the IWM Centenary Programme of events The Tank Museum are taking a step back in time on 7th & 8th December and showing how Christmas was celebrated during the two world wars in their Wartime Chistmas Festival 2013. Click here for more information

     
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    Frontline Kent

    Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, November 12, 2013


    Anniversary Tours of The First World War and World War II


    Picture Source: Wikipedia

    On the eve of three major approaching anniversaries in 2014 – 100 years since the outbreak of the First World War, 75 since the outbreak of World War Two and 70 since D-Day – Kent invites you to come on a friendly invasion to 'Frontline Kent'. This wonderful itinerary produced by Visit Kent has a variety of ideas and trips to suit all ages and is, for those children in or near Kent, a brilliant learning resource for their extraordinary local history. 

    Guarding the shortest sea crossing to Europe, Kent has been on the frontline of England’s defence for centuries, and this role came to the fore in both World Wars. Visit Dover, "Lock and Key of England", the house that hid code breakers, the coast where bouncing bombs were tested, the secret tunnels from which Operation Dynamo was masterminded and airfields from which Spitfires and Hurricanes flew. 


    Dover Castle
    Source: Wikipedia

    If your County has a similar commemoration programme in place, do let us know so that we can share these ideas and promote discovery of your local history.




     
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    Planting poppies to honour Battle of Britain Pilots

    Victoria Nielson - Tuesday, November 12, 2013


    The Battle of Britain

    75th Anniversary July - October 2015

    Hungry for History will be planting poppy seeds at Manston Airport, Kent in early 2015 in time to flower in the Summer to honour all those that flew and never made it home during the Battle of Britain.

    More details will follow next year but, in the meantime, if you would like your school in Kent to be involved, please do contact us.

    The Battle of Britain Roll of Honour:

    'The Few' were 2,353 young men from Great Britain and 574 from overseas, pilots and other aircrew, who are officially recognised as having taken part in the Battle of Britain. Each flew at least one authorised operational sortie with an eligible unit of the Royal Air Force or Fleet Air Arm during the period 10 July to 31 October 1940.

    544 lost their lives during the period of the Battle of Britain



    Manston Airport in Thanet, Kent was one of the key airports during The Battle of Britain. Its position close to the cliffs and its long and broad runway made it the perfect landing for planes that had been damaged during the fighting.

    Hungry for History will be organising a day for local school children to come together and sow thousands of seeds at Manston to honour the Battle of Britain pilots that both fought and lost their lives during World War II. More details will be available in due course but we hope as many schools as possible in this area get involved and plant as many seeds as possible to show our nation's gratitude to the "few".



    Winston Churchill said:"The gratitude of every home in our Island, in our Empire, and indeed throughout the world, except in the abodes of the guilty, goes out to the British airmen who, undaunted by odds, unwearied in their constant challenge and mortal danger, are turning the tide of the World War by their prowess and by their devotion. Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few. All hearts go out to the fighter pilots, whose brilliant actions we see with our own eyes day after day, but we must never forget that all the time, night after night, month after month, our bomber squadrons travel far into Germany, find their targets in the darkness by the highest navigational skill, aim their attacks, often under the heaviest fire, often with serious loss, with deliberate, careful discrimination, and inflict shattering blows upon the whole of the technical and war-making structure of the Nazi power. On no part of the Royal Air Force does the weight of the war fall more heavily than on the daylight bombers who will play an invaluable part in the case of invasion and whose unflinching zeal it has been necessary in the meanwhile on numerous occasions to restrain…

    It is worth noting that there are two first-rate museums close by to the airport which are well worth a visit:

    The RAF Manston History Museum: http://www.rafmanston.co.uk/
    The RAF Manston Spitfire & Hurricane Museum http://www.spitfiremuseum.org.uk/
     
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